World's Coolest Hotel Bathrooms

  • Estancia Vik bathroom

    Photo: Courtesy of Estancia Vik

    1 of 12

    From Paris to Utah, these are the coolest bathrooms from around the globe.

    From June 2011 By

    I first fell for Tokyo when I arrived at the Four Seasons Hotel at Marunouchi and read the little sign in my bathroom.

    “Don’t be afraid of our toilet,” the note begged, politely, reassuringly.

    I was far from afraid. I was transfixed, happy. I pressed all the buttons on the toilet, even the ones with the pictures of things I’d never want to have happen or couldn’t really comprehend. When that was done, I drew a bath in the outsize tub at the center of the room, fiddled with the electric shades and dimmers, turned on some hotel music, disgorged all the bath salts, and fetched a Cognac from the mini-bar.

    Our bathroom rituals are different in hotels than they are at home because the function of that room is altered and enlarged. The home bath is a way station on the path of the everyday. Traveling, we’re off our routine and in need of comfort, warmth, and cleansing.

    At a hotel, we check in, get shown the room. Suffer the little song and dance where the porter points out the safe and the TV remote and we say aloud “Oh, that’s a TV remote,” and think, Please go. Finally alone, we’ll check the bed for bounce, look for power plugs, do a quick unpack. But it’s in the bathroom where we really commune with our surroundings: we run all the taps, unwrap the arsenal of try-me toiletries, steam up the place, and relax.

    There are hotel bathrooms that follow the modern architect’s dictum to bring the outside in. In Vancouver, I’ve watched seaplanes skimming the blue water below my bath. In Tanzania, I propped my feet up on the edge of the tub in my hut at Ngorongoro Crater Lodge and looked over my toes as the sun set over the golden bowl of the crater below. Other rooms take you somewhere else, suggesting an idealized past or a super-engineered future. I’m thinking of the butler call buttons in the Art Deco baths of Claridge’s, in London, or the tricked-out but beautiful bathrooms of the Hyatt on the Bund, in Shanghai, where the toilet seats, sensing your proximity, rise in robotic salute.

    I don’t know what it is that’s so pleasing about a big, well-appointed bathroom to the needy, travel-weary mind and body. I only know that it upends my aesthetic standards in the same way a splendiferous breakfast spread makes me hungry in the morning, even though I only drink coffee back home. If in New York I’m not much for products, on the road I want a riot of foaming balms and body scrubs, I want anti-stress, anti-jet-lag, time-reversing essential oils. And I want them all freshly replaced every time I leave the room. I want my loofah, my savon doux, my sewing kit, my shoe mitt and tiny toothpaste tubes, my backlit magnifying mirror and the weird power socket with the funny shavers only label that will charge an iPhone without an adapter. Give me as many sinks as possible, a hair dryer that blows like holy hell, and a hydra-headed shower more hydro-jet than rainfall, and it doesn’t matter what city the hotel happens to be in, I’m in heaven. (I tend to picture the actual afterlife as a plush hotel bathroom with infinitely late checkout: clouds of marble and comfy white robes, a halo of flattering light the better to see our freshly scrubbed selves reflected in the fogless mirror. Throw in a television mounted at the foot of a soaking tub and I’m sold.

    The trend in recent years has been to supersize and glamorize the hotel bathroom and we (I’m assuming you’re with me on this?) are very okay with that. The hotel bathroom is like a spa where you don’t have to see other people, a proverbial vacation from your vacation. It’s the best seat in the house (so why not put a telephone next to that seat, even if nobody has ever figured out what you’re supposed to do with it?). This is the hotel real estate where we’ll spend the greatest amount of time awake, where we can wash away the grit of the day and ready ourselves for rest, so we desire bathrooms that are glorious, harmonious, maybe a little bit ridiculous, and always (forgive me) commodious.

    A few nits to pick in this monsoon of praise: Hoteliers, please don’t put a price tag on everything. We don’t need to be told that a bathrobe in our suitcase will mean an addition to the bill any more than we need to be reminded that all flights are nonsmoking or you can’t drink the duty-free brandy on the plane. Also: Why is closed now the default mode of the sink drain? Under what circumstances do I need the drain shut tight? And another thing: The little fancy finishing triangle-fold you put on the toilet paper? The one you think announces “We’ve thought of everything”? What it actually says to me is, “We were just in here, touching stuff.” For the love of God, leave off the origami. Sometimes, when the steam from my hour-long shower has cleared, I find the little notes about how committed you are to saving the planet, one damp towel at a time. That’s sweet. But given the smorgasbord of eco-destructiveness that is the modern hotel bathroom, it’s a bit like leaving a Bible in the bedside table at a whorehouse.

    But these are minor quibbles. Hotel bathrooms, we love you. And, as long as you have a set of clean towels toasting on the warming racks and a replenished stash of amenities, we always will.

    Adam Sachs is a T+L contributing editor.

  • Estancia Vik bathroom

    Photo: Courtesy of Estancia Vik

    2 of 12

    Estancia Vik, José Ignacio, Uruguay

    In a nod to the 4,000 acres of countryside surrounding the hotel in José Ignacio, the smooth wooden walls—and tub—of the Vik Master Suite are built from local jacaranda trees.

  • The Ritz Paris

    Photo: Courtesy of C Madamour/Ritz Paris

    3 of 12

    The Ritz Paris

    Swan-shaped faucets gilded in genuine gold leaf, lush peach-pink robes, rope cords once used to call for martinis...what else would you expect from the iconic hotel where Coco Chanel once lived?

  • Amangiri

    Photo: Courtesy of Amanresorts

    4 of 12

    Amangiri, Canyon Point, UT

    The Utah desert is the focus here: all bathrooms have oblong windows that look out onto a 165-million-year-old mesa, the walls are built from sandstone, and amenities are scented with desert sage.

  • Claridge's hotel bathroom

    Photo: Courtesy of Claridge's Hotel

    5 of 12

    Claridge’s, London

    Recently renovated by London-based designer David Linley, the mint- and ebony-marble powder rooms pay homage to the 1920’s.

  • Hyatt on the Bund bathroom

    Photo: Courtesy of Hyatt on the Bund

    6 of 12

    Hyatt on the Bund, Shanghai

    Bathing is never dull in the eastern-facing bathrooms at Hyatt on the Bund, where floor-to-ceiling windows provide unobstructed cityscapes of Pudong skyscrapers across the Huangpu River.

  • Ponta dos Ganchos bathroom

    Photo: Courtesy of Ponta dos Ganchos

    7 of 12

    Ponta dos Ganchos, Brazil

    Fronting a calm inlet of the Atlantic, the garapeira-wood retreat in Ponta dos Ganchos’ Especial Vila Esmeralda houses daybeds for wildlife gazing, an infinity-edge lap pool, and even a mini-gym; if you prefer a soak to a workout, the whirlpool includes a built-in stereo system.

  • Gora Kadan bathroom

    Photo: Kazuyoshi Miyoshi/Courtesy of Gora Kadan

    8 of 12

    Gôra Kadan, Hakone, Japan

    Ever felt like bathing in a Zen garden? Book room No. 702 at Gôra Kadan, a secluded ryokan 65 miles south of Tokyo—its open-air soaking tub sources hot water from mineral springs on the hotel grounds.

  • Post Ranch Inn bathroom

    Photo: Kodiak Greenwood/Courtesy of Post Ranch Inn

    9 of 12

    Post Ranch Inn, Big Sur, CA

    With a private terrace overlooking Big Sur, a Pacific suite’s stainless-steel tub is the perfect spot to take in the sunset.

  • The Mark bathroom

    Photo: Todd Eberle/Courtesy of The Mark Hotel

    10 of 12

    The Mark, New York City

    All 161 Art Deco–inspired bathrooms here earn their (marble) stripes with his-and-hers vanities, Bang & Olufsen phones, and in-mirror televisions—complete with waterproof remotes.

  • Four Seasons Hotel Firenze bathroom

    Photo: Simon Watson

    11 of 12

    Four Seasons Hotel Firenze, Italy

    The only thing more ornate than the oval marble bathtub, tasseled velvet curtains, and antique frescoes on the ceiling of the Renaissance suites are the soaps and shampoos: local perfumer Lorenzo Villoresi creates them using centuries-old techniques, as well as ingredients such as mignonette flowers and chaulmoogra trees.

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    12 of 12

  • Estancia Vik bathroom

    I first fell for Tokyo when I arrived at the Four Seasons Hotel at Marunouchi and read the little sign in my bathroom.

    “Don’t be afraid of our toilet,” the note begged, politely, reassuringly.

    I was far from afraid. I was transfixed, happy. I pressed all the buttons on the toilet, even the ones with the pictures of things I’d never want to have happen or couldn’t really comprehend. When that was done, I drew a bath in the outsize tub at the center of the room, fiddled with the electric shades and dimmers, turned on some hotel music, disgorged all the bath salts, and fetched a Cognac from the mini-bar.

    Our bathroom rituals are different in hotels than they are at home because the function of that room is altered and enlarged. The home bath is a way station on the path of the everyday. Traveling, we’re off our routine and in need of comfort, warmth, and cleansing.

    At a hotel, we check in, get shown the room. Suffer the little song and dance where the porter points out the safe and the TV remote and we say aloud “Oh, that’s a TV remote,” and think, Please go. Finally alone, we’ll check the bed for bounce, look for power plugs, do a quick unpack. But it’s in the bathroom where we really commune with our surroundings: we run all the taps, unwrap the arsenal of try-me toiletries, steam up the place, and relax.

    There are hotel bathrooms that follow the modern architect’s dictum to bring the outside in. In Vancouver, I’ve watched seaplanes skimming the blue water below my bath. In Tanzania, I propped my feet up on the edge of the tub in my hut at Ngorongoro Crater Lodge and looked over my toes as the sun set over the golden bowl of the crater below. Other rooms take you somewhere else, suggesting an idealized past or a super-engineered future. I’m thinking of the butler call buttons in the Art Deco baths of Claridge’s, in London, or the tricked-out but beautiful bathrooms of the Hyatt on the Bund, in Shanghai, where the toilet seats, sensing your proximity, rise in robotic salute.

    I don’t know what it is that’s so pleasing about a big, well-appointed bathroom to the needy, travel-weary mind and body. I only know that it upends my aesthetic standards in the same way a splendiferous breakfast spread makes me hungry in the morning, even though I only drink coffee back home. If in New York I’m not much for products, on the road I want a riot of foaming balms and body scrubs, I want anti-stress, anti-jet-lag, time-reversing essential oils. And I want them all freshly replaced every time I leave the room. I want my loofah, my savon doux, my sewing kit, my shoe mitt and tiny toothpaste tubes, my backlit magnifying mirror and the weird power socket with the funny shavers only label that will charge an iPhone without an adapter. Give me as many sinks as possible, a hair dryer that blows like holy hell, and a hydra-headed shower more hydro-jet than rainfall, and it doesn’t matter what city the hotel happens to be in, I’m in heaven. (I tend to picture the actual afterlife as a plush hotel bathroom with infinitely late checkout: clouds of marble and comfy white robes, a halo of flattering light the better to see our freshly scrubbed selves reflected in the fogless mirror. Throw in a television mounted at the foot of a soaking tub and I’m sold.

    The trend in recent years has been to supersize and glamorize the hotel bathroom and we (I’m assuming you’re with me on this?) are very okay with that. The hotel bathroom is like a spa where you don’t have to see other people, a proverbial vacation from your vacation. It’s the best seat in the house (so why not put a telephone next to that seat, even if nobody has ever figured out what you’re supposed to do with it?). This is the hotel real estate where we’ll spend the greatest amount of time awake, where we can wash away the grit of the day and ready ourselves for rest, so we desire bathrooms that are glorious, harmonious, maybe a little bit ridiculous, and always (forgive me) commodious.

    A few nits to pick in this monsoon of praise: Hoteliers, please don’t put a price tag on everything. We don’t need to be told that a bathrobe in our suitcase will mean an addition to the bill any more than we need to be reminded that all flights are nonsmoking or you can’t drink the duty-free brandy on the plane. Also: Why is closed now the default mode of the sink drain? Under what circumstances do I need the drain shut tight? And another thing: The little fancy finishing triangle-fold you put on the toilet paper? The one you think announces “We’ve thought of everything”? What it actually says to me is, “We were just in here, touching stuff.” For the love of God, leave off the origami. Sometimes, when the steam from my hour-long shower has cleared, I find the little notes about how committed you are to saving the planet, one damp towel at a time. That’s sweet. But given the smorgasbord of eco-destructiveness that is the modern hotel bathroom, it’s a bit like leaving a Bible in the bedside table at a whorehouse.

    But these are minor quibbles. Hotel bathrooms, we love you. And, as long as you have a set of clean towels toasting on the warming racks and a replenished stash of amenities, we always will.

    Adam Sachs is a T+L contributing editor.

  • Estancia Vik bathroom

    Estancia Vik, José Ignacio, Uruguay

    In a nod to the 4,000 acres of countryside surrounding the hotel in José Ignacio, the smooth wooden walls—and tub—of the Vik Master Suite are built from local jacaranda trees.

  • The Ritz Paris

    The Ritz Paris

    Swan-shaped faucets gilded in genuine gold leaf, lush peach-pink robes, rope cords once used to call for martinis...what else would you expect from the iconic hotel where Coco Chanel once lived?

  • Amangiri

    Amangiri, Canyon Point, UT

    The Utah desert is the focus here: all bathrooms have oblong windows that look out onto a 165-million-year-old mesa, the walls are built from sandstone, and amenities are scented with desert sage.

  • Claridge's hotel bathroom

    Claridge’s, London

    Recently renovated by London-based designer David Linley, the mint- and ebony-marble powder rooms pay homage to the 1920’s.

  • Hyatt on the Bund bathroom

    Hyatt on the Bund, Shanghai

    Bathing is never dull in the eastern-facing bathrooms at Hyatt on the Bund, where floor-to-ceiling windows provide unobstructed cityscapes of Pudong skyscrapers across the Huangpu River.

  • Ponta dos Ganchos bathroom

    Ponta dos Ganchos, Brazil

    Fronting a calm inlet of the Atlantic, the garapeira-wood retreat in Ponta dos Ganchos’ Especial Vila Esmeralda houses daybeds for wildlife gazing, an infinity-edge lap pool, and even a mini-gym; if you prefer a soak to a workout, the whirlpool includes a built-in stereo system.

  • Gora Kadan bathroom

    Gôra Kadan, Hakone, Japan

    Ever felt like bathing in a Zen garden? Book room No. 702 at Gôra Kadan, a secluded ryokan 65 miles south of Tokyo—its open-air soaking tub sources hot water from mineral springs on the hotel grounds.

  • Post Ranch Inn bathroom

    Post Ranch Inn, Big Sur, CA

    With a private terrace overlooking Big Sur, a Pacific suite’s stainless-steel tub is the perfect spot to take in the sunset.

  • The Mark bathroom

    The Mark, New York City

    All 161 Art Deco–inspired bathrooms here earn their (marble) stripes with his-and-hers vanities, Bang & Olufsen phones, and in-mirror televisions—complete with waterproof remotes.

  • Four Seasons Hotel Firenze bathroom

    Four Seasons Hotel Firenze, Italy

    The only thing more ornate than the oval marble bathtub, tasseled velvet curtains, and antique frescoes on the ceiling of the Renaissance suites are the soaps and shampoos: local perfumer Lorenzo Villoresi creates them using centuries-old techniques, as well as ingredients such as mignonette flowers and chaulmoogra trees.

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