South Africa's Upside Down House is what Instagram was made for.

By Andrea Romano
Updated March 11, 2020
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A visitor pretends to hold the structure up at the upside-down house in Hartbeespoort, South Africa. With its roof on the ground and it floor in the air, the upside down house is attracting tourists who want to see the world from a different perspective Daily Life, Hartbeespoort, South Africa.
Themba Hadebe/AP/Shutterstock

Things are a little different in the Upside Down. No, not the Upside Down you’re thinking of.

There is a house in South Africa that actually looks like it’s been turned over on its roof, gaining it the apt title, the Upside Down House, according to the Associated Press (AP). While this little house-slash-art-installation may seem quirky, don’t worry – you’re not in an alternate dimension.

According to the AP, the house is located near Hartebeestpoort, about 75 kilometers (47 miles) north of Johannesburg. Not only is the house flipped upside down on the outside, but it’s also flipped on the inside.

A visitor sits on the floor of the sitting room at the upside-down house in Hartbeespoort, South Africa. With its roof on the ground and it floor in the air, the upside down house is attracting tourists who want to see the world from a different perspectiveDaily Life, Hartbeespoort, South Africa - 05 Mar 2020
Themba Hadebe/AP/Shutterstock

Think of it as a nice departure from the ordinary. In fact, putting things upside down has become a bit of a trend. For the last few years, upside-down Christmas trees have gained a lot of popularity.

Lots of tourists like to flock there, if only just to take pictures of themselves standing under this precarious-looking home, or sitting in rooms with sofas, dining tables, beds, and appliances on the ceiling.

“A ‘world’ turned upside down,” it says in a statement on the house’s website. “The birth of the inspirational idea of this ingenious ‘house’ became real by the reflection of a peculiar presence, which in the existing world might sometimes feel upside down.”

While it may look like some giant just came by and turned the house on its “head,” anyone who had studied engineering or architecture will tell you that building such a house is actually quite an impressive feat. It’s obviously not easy balancing a whole house on the edge of a slanted roof.

Even though you can’t stay in the Upside Down House, you can certainly visit for plenty of amazing Instagram moments. The house is open Monday through Thursday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Friday through Sunday and public holidays from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Admission for this topsy-turvy tourist attraction is 90 South African Rand ($5.57 USD) for adults, 60 South African Rand ($3.71 USD) for children between four and seven, and children under four get in for free. There are also discounts available for large groups.

For more information about visiting the house, visit the Upside Down House website.