The Alchemist in Denmark is now serving up food for vulnerable people affected by coronavirus.

By Alison Fox
April 15, 2020
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A meal at the Alchemist in Denmark will run you more than $400. But since closing due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the 2-Michelin star restaurant had started cooking for a slightly different crowd: those who are homeless and socially vulnerable.

For now, the renowned restaurant, which is fully booked through mid-July after it plans on reopening next month, has devoted its four kitchens to chef Rasmus Munk’s JunkFood project, aimed at giving people who don’t have a home nutritious meals.

“This is a moment in time where we have a lot of extra time and four empty kitchens,” Munk told the United Nations Regional Information Centre for Western Europe. “It is hard not to have anything to get up for in the morning, especially when one is used to working 16 or 17 hour shifts.”

Munk, 28, first put out a call to other chefs in an Instagram post last month, writing that in “a time where everyone is urged to stay at home, those who don’t have a home are in dire need of help.”

Since starting the project, Munk said he is serving 550 meals each day to 12 shelters in Copenhagen.

“It is part of the Alchemist‘s philosophy to try to make a difference – both in our gastronomy and in our daily communication with guests,” he said.

Credit: Courtesy of Alchemist

Munk, of course, is no stranger to using food to promote social activism, according to the UNRIC, noting he once served up a cherry sauce that looked like blood to promote the idea of signing up to be an organ donor.

“This project is, in a way, just another aspect of that with the focus now shifting to making a difference on a more one-to-one scale,” the chef said. “We have had a fantastic response from the industry and have been supported with both ingredients and help in delivering food to the shelters.”

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