From Colorado to California, here's where you can spot some stunning wildflowers across this U.S. this spring and summer.

By Skye Sherman
March 19, 2021
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While the COVID-19 pandemic has certainly stalled many aspects of our everyday lives, Earth itself has kept on turning. For a reminder of all the beauty in the world, we need only to open our eyes to the rejuvenating spirit of spring, which arrives every year no matter how tough the preceding winter felt, expressing itself most colorfully in fields of wildflowers.

While the California super bloom might not occur this year, there are still plenty of places to admire wildflowers in the spring and summer. Plus, road tripping to see these blooms is a great way to get outdoors while still keeping your distance from others, so go forth and explore.

Texas wildflowers at Crowley Park in Richardson, TX
Credit: Courtesy of Travel Texas

Texas

From March to May, head to Texas to enjoy wide-open spaces and massive fields blanketed in colorful spring flowers. On a drive through Texas Hill Country, for example, there's a good chance you'll spot bluebonnets (the Lone Star State's flower), Indian paintbrushes, pink evening primroses, daisies, winecups, prairie verbenas, and goldeneye phloxes.

Drive the popular 80-mile loop from Brenham to Chappell Hill, hitting Burton, Independence, and Washington along the way before heading back to Brenham. En route, you're likely to spot thistles, purple coneflowers, verbenas, beardtongues, skullcaps, prairie parsley, yellow wild indigo, blue-eyed grasses, blanket flowers, and more.

South Dakota

In South Dakota, you'll get the added bonus of roaming wildlife with a trip to see the wildflowers, which bloom from late March through May. Plus, there are natural wonders and national monuments to explore, including Custer State Park, Mount Rushmore, and the Crazy Horse Memorial.

Visit Badlands National Park in the spring, and the gorgeous natural scenery that's there year-round will be complemented with pops of bright color from scarlet globemallows, yellow salsifies, and sego lilies. At Custer State Park, the floral highlights are upright prairie coneflowers, Woods' roses, and Rocky Mountain blazing stars.

Antelope Valley Poppy Preserve one hour north of Los Angeles
Credit: George Rose/Getty Images

Florida

So, they're not exactly wildflowers, but South Florida's tabebuia trees (also known as trumpet trees) are still a sight to behold. Each spring, the trees erupt in clouds of yellow — sunny as the state itself — or a light pastel pink that perfectly captures the spirit of springtime. Head to Palm Beach starting in March to spot these colorful blooms.

California

California may not see a super bloom this spring, but you can still expect the state to be covered in wildflowers — typically from February through April, depending on rainfall. Head to spots like the Antelope Valley California Poppy Reserve, Anza-Borrego Desert State Park, and the Carlsbad Flower Fields for the best chances of spotting beautiful blooms.

A field of lupines in the foreground and Crested Butte Mountain in the background lit up by the sun rise
Credit: Brad McGinley/Getty Images

Colorado

Procrastinators can head to Colorado for their flower fix, as this state typically sees its best blooms in July and August rather than in the springtime. Colorado is ideal for a summer hiking trip because not only is the weather glorious, but trails across the state are surrounded by a rainbow of wildflowers. Head to Crested Butte, considered to be the "Wildflower Capital of Colorado," for the Crested Butte Wildflower Festival and great hiking opportunities, or Steamboat Springs to spot the Colorado blue columbine and red Indian paintbrush on the trails.

Montana

Both the prairie and alpine wildflowers of Glacier National Park reach their peak from late June to mid-July, so summer is a good time to visit one of the nation's most beautiful national parks and enjoy its explosion of beautiful blooms (glacier lilies, clematis, pinesaps, and purple asters, to name a few). More than 1,000 varieties of wildflowers grow at Glacier National Park, which means summer visitors will have no shortage of eye candy.