The year's best sunrises and sunsets are here.

By Stacey Leasca
May 30, 2019
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New York City may be a place filled with massive concrete buildings, but that doesn’t mean it isn’t filled with natural wonders too. Take, for example, the yearly event known as Manhattanhenge.

Each year, New York experiences an astronomical event that draws thousands of tourists to one specific spot in the city to see the best sunset of the year. And, best of all, you’ve got two chances to see it for yourself. Here’s everything you need to know about 2019’s Manhattanhenge event.

What is Manhattanhenge anyway?

As Travel+Leisure previously explained, Manhattanhenge is a yearly astrological event that takes place both before and after the summer solstice. It’s when the sun aligns with New York City’s street grid, creating an awe-inspiring sunset glow across the city. Of course, there are a few places to watch it that are better than others so keep scrolling to learn where you should set up camp.

Where did the name Manhattanhenge come from?

The name was coined by the famed scientist Neil DeGrasse Tyson. Years ago he described the phenomenon as “when the setting Sun aligns precisely with the Manhattan street grid, creating a radiant glow of light across Manhattan's brick and steel canyons, simultaneously illuminating both the north and south sides of every cross street of the borough's grid.”

When does Manhattanhenge take place?

The event normally occurs once in May, and once in July. This week, The New York Times reported, it will take place on Thurs., May 30, 8:12 p.m. (with the first event having happened on May 29). In July, you’ll also be able to spot it on Fri., July 12, at 8:20 p.m. Eastern time, and Sat., July 13, at 8:21 p.m. Eastern time.

Where is the best spot to watch Manhattanhenge?

Luckily there are a few spots you can see this event. According to The New York Times, it’s crucial to find a place with a clear view of New Jersey. The most popular spot is down 42nd Street as well as 57th, 34th, 23rd, and 14th Streets. Though some people also head to Pershing Square to catch a glimpse.

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