The program focuses on the science and math components of design.

By Stacey Leasca
April 28, 2020
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While we won’t call entertaining and educating kids stuck at home an easy task, we can at least say there are plenty of places stepping up to fill the virtual void. That includes museums offering virtual tours, destinations providing virtual views, and even national parks hosting virtual hikes, all of which make for excellent virtual field trips. But, if your kid is more into math and science now’s their time to shine thanks to The Frank Lloyd Wright Virtual Classroom.

On April 15, the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation launched the Frank Lloyd Wright Virtual Classroom, a six-week digital program for students K–12 aimed at helping children learn more about the intersection of art and science.

The Washington Post / Contributor / Getty Images

The program was created in conjunction with Arizona’s Paradise Valley School District on “STEAM-focused lessons” to help students understand a bit more about design theory.

Classes include “How like Wright are you?” which invites students to watch a video and answer a few quick questions to determine just how similar they are to the famed designer.

Subsequent lessons include how to create squares, patterns, and realistic drawings, as well as triangles, load-bearing shapes, and stylistic drawings. In the lessons, students learn about “shapes that live in your environment and the patterns that they may have.” Students are then tasked to find a plant around them and recreate the shapes using a pattern sheet provided.

Students then go on to learn about the impact of color in a design as well as completing a final design project.

However, students don’t have to take the complete class to take part in the fun. The program also offers other hands-on activities to try at home, all once again focused on Wright’s design theories and concepts.

Early lessons and activities are already available. New lessons launch every Wednesday through May 20, giving students plenty of time to catch up and become the little design masters they were meant to be.