By Evie Carrick
August 08, 2019
A flag warning about rough seas is pictured next to a beach in Suao, Yilan county, as Typhoon Lekima approaches off the shores of eastern Taiwan on August 8, 2019.
SAM YEH/Getty Images

Residents of Taiwan and the southern Japanese islands are preparing for the arrival of Typhoon Lekima. The storm, which could become a super typhoon by Thursday, is expected to hit the region with sustained winds of 127 miles per hour, according to CNN.

In response to the storm's impending arrival, both countries issued severe weather warnings and are urging residents to take cover.

Taiwanese authorities have also ordered the closure of markets, businesses, and schools on Friday. Already, officials have canceled flights and issued landslide warnings in response to the approaching typhoon. But, the storm isn't the only issue facing Taiwan. On Wednesday, the country also experienced a 6.0-magnitude earthquake.

This overview shows fishing boats packed into the typhoon shelter at Nanfangao harbour in Suao, Yilan county, as Typhoon Lekima approaches off the shores of eastern Taiwan on August 8, 2019.
SAM YEH/Getty Images

"An earthquake struck when we are making preparations for the typhoon, which is a rare event," premier Su Tseng-chang said a meeting at a national emergency center, according to Reuters.

Meanwhile, Japan's southern Ryukyu Islands — which includes Okinawa — are bracing for the storm's impact as well. Japan's Meteorological Agency reported it expects high waves, thunderstorms, and storm surges. In response, the Japanese cities of Miyakojima and Ishigaki issued a level 4 (out of 5) evacuation advisory.

Mitsugu Noguchi of the Japan Meteorological Agency said of the event, if Lekima becomes a super typhoon, it could mean a "serious natural disaster is [about] to take place."

The typhoon is expected to come closest to Taiwan on Friday before moving toward China, south of Shanghai, on Saturday evening. CNN reports, by the time the storm hits China it should slow, but could still have winds up to 100 miles per hour.

Those traveling through Taiwan, Japan, and China can prepare for the typhoon by securing an adequate supply of food and clean water. Those in its path should also seek shelter and pack a few flashlights in case the power goes out.

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