Forget the tan lines this summer.

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Sometimes you just want to bask in the glory of the sun and let it hit everything God gave you. And that's when you know it's time to head to one of the world's stunning nude beaches.

To help nude sunbathers, swimwear brand Pour Moi created a global guide showcasing where travelers can sunbathe topless or naked, without breaking the law. The brand's guide includes 39 countries around the world that permit either one, meaning there is most certainly a destination for every type of traveler.

"We know a lot of our customers like to ditch their swimsuit when they sunbathe, and with tentative steps being made towards international travel opening up, we wanted to help people find out where you can and can't go topless when you sunbathe," Pour Moi founder, Michael Thomson, shared in a statement. "We're a U.K. company and Brits are stereotyped as being quite prude, but it's not true, a lot of us love to embrace more naturist ways in the sunshine! It's been fun comparing which countries are most interested in sunbathing naked, versus what the actual nudity laws are in that country."

Warning sign at the nude beach
Credit: ericsphotography/Getty Images

According to the company's research, plenty of people are looking for this freeing tanning option. Even at the height of the pandemic, it found there were more than 10.7 million Google searches for "nude beaches," "nude resorts," and "sunbathe nude." The majority of those searches were made by those living in the U.S., followed by those in Japan and Brazil. (When the company adjusted for population size, the people of Australia, New Zealand, and Ireland came out on top, which basically proves everyone is interested to know more.)

To find out just where all these Googlers should go in real life, the team spent weeks pouring over their research, which included analyzing the individual laws of each country, cross-referencing them with travel forums, blogs, and social media posts to determine which countries you can actually sunbathe naked in without getting arrested. Then, it created a handy map so everyone could easily see all the places they can go to get a tan without any tan lines.

Map of guide to nude sunbathing worldwide
Credit: Courtesy of Pour Moi

The company explained, "The 38 countries in red are ones where public nudity of any kind, even non-offensive public topless sunbathing, is completely unacceptable or illegal." Those in green (39 countries total), are the places that are "pretty relaxed about public topless or nude sunbathing, allowing it in multiple official and unofficial locations." And the 29 countries in amber indicate "laws that are ambiguous or contradictory, or where there are very limited places to naked sunbathe — these places will require a bit more research before taking off your swimsuit."

Map of guide to nude sunbathing in the U.S.
Credit: Courtesy of Pour Moi

For example, in the U.S., the company found 32 states that allow for nude sunbathing, however, it isn't legal in Utah, Indiana, South Carolina, or Tennessee, thus it got the red color. In contrast, plenty of other states were marked green to indicate places you could potentially sunbathe topless.

Want to see more? Check out the full research on the Pour Moi website and start planning a trip (with very little packing required) now. Just remember, check local laws and regulations at your specific destination before planning any trips.