And when it comes to restaurants, Vail will require diners 12 and older to show proof of vaccination to eat at indoor cafeteria-style eateries.

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With the 2021 ski season is just around the corner, Vail Resorts just released new health and safety protocols for visitors gearing up to hit the slopes.

Unlike last year, the ski resort mecca will not require mountain reservations at its resorts this year and will load lifts and gondolas at full capacity, the company shared with Travel + Leisure this week. Additionally, Vail Resorts will require that masks be worn in public indoor settings, including restaurants and restrooms, but will not require them in lift lines or on chair lifts and gondolas.

"We are fortunate that the core of our experience takes place outdoors in vast mountain settings," Rob Katz, chairman and CEO of Vail Resorts, said in a statement provided to T+L. "However, as we welcome guests from around the world to the indoor experience at our resorts, we feel it's important to do our part to combat the spread of COVID-19."

When it comes to restaurants, Vail will require diners 12 and older to show proof of vaccination to eat at indoor cafeteria-style eateries. Vaccinations will also be required for those 12 and older participating in ski and ride school programs that provide lunch.

Vail Resorts
Credit: Courtesy of Vail Resorts

The ski and ride school programs will be the only part of the resort that will require guests to be vaccinated except if there is a superseding local rule (like at Whistler Blackcomb where proof of vaccination is required in all indoor restaurants, restaurant patios, and bars).

Reservations will also be mandatory for many on-mountain restaurants, which the resort expects to open up for bookings the day before.

Beyond guests, all Vail Resorts employees will be required to be vaccinated, according to the company.

Arrabelle Resort vail
Arrabelle at Vail Square
| Credit: Courtesy of Vail Resorts

This year, Vail Resorts (which boasts some of the best ski resorts in Colorado and beyond), has dropped the prices of its Epic Pass, which grants skiers and snowboarders admission to dozens of resorts in the United States and abroad. Currently, the Epic Pass is 20% off last year's prices at only $799 for unlimited, unrestricted access.

Keystone will be the first of the company's resorts to open in October, followed by Breckenridge and Vail on Nov. 12.

Alison Fox is a contributing writer for Travel + Leisure. When she's not in New York City, she likes to spend her time at the beach or exploring new destinations and hopes to visit every country in the world. Follow her adventures on Instagram.