By Cailey Rizzo
March 28, 2019
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Of all the misfortunate things that can happen to a traveler in an airport, perhaps the most dreaded is a canceled flight. It conjures up images of standing in line, trying to sleep on uncomfortable airport chairs, and arguing with customer service agents.

But it is a fate that is more common in some airports than others, according to a new ranking put together by travel insurance website InsureMyTrip.

For the second consecutive year, New York’s LaGuardia Airport had the highest percentage of flight cancelations of any airport in the country. According to Department of Transportation data, 4.07 percent of flights out of LaGuardia were canceled in 2018. Although some LGA haters may delight in this news, operations at the airport are not entirely to blame. Winter Storm Grayson in January 2018 forced the airport to temporarily shut down. (For context: Other New York City airports were further down the list. Newark Liberty International ranked in sixth place with 3.53 percent of flights canceled and John F. Kennedy International ranked 13th with 2.70 percent of flights canceled.)

But weather is not the main factor in determining an airport’s likelihood of canceling your flight. Virginia’s Norfolk International airport, not known for its bad weather, came in second place with four percent of flights canceled. The other runner-up was Charleston, South Carolina, canceling 3.89 percent of flights in 2018.

Of all airports listed in the survey, Salt Lake City International (which receives, on average, 60 inches of snow per year) only canceled 0.30 percent of flights in 2018.

Runners up for best performance were Idaho’s Boise Air Terminal (with only 0.43 percent of flights canceled), Hawaii’s Kahului Airport (0.50 percent canceled), Sacramento International (0.59 percent) and Oregon’s Portland International (0.62 percent).

But overall, across the country, very few flights ended up getting canceled. The Department of Transportation reports that only 1.62 percent of all flights departing the U.S. were canceled in 2018 and, according to InsureMyTrip, the majority of those cancelations can be attributed to significant meteorological events like hurricanes or winter storms.

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