By Talia Avakian
February 16, 2018
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The Lunar New Year, which marks the first day on the lunar calendar, is considered one of the most celebrated of Korea’s national holidays.

The celebration, which lands on Feb. 16 this year, takes place over the course of three days as families gather together to exchange gifts and dine on local delicacies like tteokguk (a soup made using sliced rice cakes, beef, egg, and vegetables).

To welcome in the very first sunrise of the occasion, locals often gather at Jeongdongjin Beach, located near South Korea’s 2018 Winter Olympic Park, to watch the sun illuminate the waters.

The area has mesmerizing sunsets and sunrises thanks to the fact that it sits on the eastern side of the country, known for its deep blue waters, the Korea Tourism Organization of New York told Travel + Leisure.

The beach has been growing in popularity for visitors and locals since 1995, when it was used in a Korean series named “Sandglass.”

The Lunar New Year is now underway across several countries in Asia, with China, Korea, and Vietnam celebrating the momentous holiday.