Tourists will have a week to take a coronavirus test instead of two days.

By Cailey Rizzo
Updated July 07, 2020
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Credit: DANIEL SLIM/Getty

After reopening for international travel last month, St. Lucia announced new protocols for tourists.

Beginning July 9, travelers will be required to obtain a negative COVID-19 test within seven days before their arrival and complete a pre-arrival registration form. They will also have to undergo a temperature check upon arrival. 

Previously, St. Lucia required the negative tests to have been administered within 48 hours of arrival.

Anyone who arrives without a test will be isolated and required to take one and remain in isolation until their results return. Travelers who test positive for COVID-19 will be transferred to a Respiratory Hospital for treatment and care, at their own cost. 

St. Lucia has also enacted a “travel bubble,” which allows travelers from certain countries to bypass the testing requirements.

These countries include Antigua, Barbuda, Aruba, Anguilla, Bahamas, Barbados, Bermuda, Bonaire, British Virgin Islands, Curaçao, Dominica, Grenada, Guyana, Jamaica, Monsterrat, Saint Barthelemy, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Martin, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Saint Martin, Trinidad and Tobago and Turks and Caicos. Anyone who has been in one of these areas for the 14 days prior to their arrival in St. Lucia will also be exempt from COVID-19 testing. 

In addition to the test results, travelers must complete a pre-arrival registration form and carry a copy with them. When it comes to accommodations, visitors are required t have confirmed reservations with a COVID-certified hotel before completing the document. Travelers are not allowed to stay with family members or friends in St. Lucia at this time. 

In order for hotels to receive their COVID-19 certificate from the government, they must meet more than a dozen criteria for sanitization protocols, social distancing, and other virus-related policies.

Once on the island, visitors must continue wearing face masks and practicing social distancing and will find new safety measures in taxis to separate drivers and passengers. Hand sanitizer will also be made available “at various points through the travelers’ journey.

Businesses on the island were allowed to resume their operations in June, with protocols in place for social distancing and disinfecting surfaces. Sites and attractions remain closed, although travelers can book limited tours through their hotels. Phase two of the island’s reopening will begin August 1, with details to be revealed in the coming weeks.