By Stacey Leasca
July 21, 2020
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Feeling like you need to make a quick few million bucks? You may want to look in your grandma’s attic.

According to CNN, a Chinese vase, which once sold at an auction for a mere £44 ($56) just sold at auction once again. This time, however, it went for more than 70 million Hong Kong dollars, which equates to about $9 million. The vase, CNN explained, was discovered in an elderly woman's remote country home in Central Europe.

Nicolas Chow, Chairman of Sotheby's Asia, holds the Harry Garner Reticulated Vase, a lost masterpiece of Chinese porcelain produced in limited quantities between 1742 and 1743 for the Qianlong emperor, during a media preview at Sotheby's in Hong Kong on June 26, 2020. - The vase is expected to fetch in excess of 70 million HKD (9.03 million USD) during its auction on July 11, Sotheby's said.
| Credit: ANTHONY WALLACE/AFP via Getty Images

Sotheby's described the vase as a "lost masterpiece,” as it’s actually a rare 18th-century artifact once owned by the Qianlong Emperor. However, for the last few years, it sat far outside any royal residence. Instead, it was found sitting in a home filled with cats and dogs acting as just any old decoration.

Credit: Courtesy of Sotheby's

"It is a miracle that this extraordinarily fragile vase survived half a century in a home surrounded by countless pets," Nicolas Chow, chairman of Sotheby's Asia, said in a statement.

According to Sotheby's, Amsterdam-based art consultant Johan Bosch van Rosenthal was the one who found the vase at the woman’s home. Rosenthal shared the story of his remarkable discovering in a video posted to Sotheby’s official YouTube channel.

"We reached a room with a number of Chinese works of art inherited many years ago," he said in the three-minute clip. "Her four cats walked around freely among these.”

Then, he says, she pointed out  the “partly gilded Chinese vase on a cupboard” which he says she knew was “something special and valuable."

According to CNN, the auction house then verified its authenticity and was even able to trace its previous whereabouts to the Palace of Heavenly Purity in Beijing's Forbidden City. In 1954, the vase also made its way through the auction house, where it sold for the staggeringly low price of £44 ($56).

Now, if only someone could go through my garage and find me a few million dollars worth of stuff that’d be great.