But there's a catch — couples have to prove they’ve been in a relationship and were regularly meeting for at least six months prior to the lockdown.

By Cailey Rizzo
May 28, 2020
Advertisement
picture alliance/Getty

In a small but meaningful step as countries around the world reopen in the aftermath of the coronavirus pandemic, Denmark has allowed couples that live on opposite sides of its borders to reunite.

Couples who are separated by Denmark’s borders with Germany, Sweden, Norway, and Finland are permitted to reunite — if they can prove they’ve been in a relationship and were regularly meeting for at least six months prior to the lockdown.

After concerns over privacy, the rules of proof changed to allow couples to sign a declaration of their relationship, CNN reported. But the border patrol will also accept proof of a relationship in various forms, like love letters or photos. But the proof must show that the couple has been together at least six months and were regularly meeting before the coronavirus lockdown.

"Foreigners can freely choose the extent and nature of the proof that they prefer to show to substantiate the relationship with their sweethearts in Denmark," according to the Danish National Police website. "An overall assessment will be made at the border as to whether the foreigner will be allowed to enter Denmark."

The announcement is good news for many couples, particularly one elderly couple living on opposite sides of the German-Danish border. They made headlines earlier this year when they were photographed at one of their daily border meetings, maintaining a six-foot distance while sharing coffee together.

Under the new regulations, foreigners are also permitted to enter Denmark for “worthy purposes,” such as visiting grandparents or visiting a holiday home.

As the summer approaches, europe is starting to gradually loosen its borders after closing due to COVID-19. Travel restrictions will vary country by country but it is likely that Europeans will not allow any foreign travelers to enter until June 15 at the earliest.