By Stacey Leasca
June 07, 2019
B&M Noskowski/Getty Images

On Thursday, a piece of an airplane dropped out of the sky and landed in a residential neighborhood just outside of Las Vegas, according to KTNV Las Vegas.

The piece of the plane, KTNV reported, was from a Draken aircraft. Draken, it noted, provides airplanes for military training at the nearby Nellis Air Force Base.

"An access panel fell off a Draken aircraft (Thursday) afternoon shortly after departing Nellis (Air Force Base) on a routine training mission," Scott Poteet, a spokesperson for Draken International, said in a statement. "Draken, along with the FAA, are conducting a thorough investigation to identify the cause."

Though the company called it a “routine” training event, it was anything but for the residents living in the neighborhood where the part fell.

“It was around 2:00 we heard a loud boom,” witness Mark Segundo said.

"And then I heard a smack. And it smacked over here. And when it hit it was loud,” Segundo’s neighbor, Anthony Pitts, added. “And the first thing I did was run in the house. I’m not going to lie. I was scared. I thought it was a shooting. That's how loud it was."

According to the FAA, the piece that fell from the sky was either a door or panel of a plane. Still, that knowledge gave little solace those who witnessed the event.

"I thought the world was ending or something,” Alex Lopez, another neighbor, told KTNV. “And then I came outside and saw my neighbors all staring at something."

"One of my kids could have been walking out here and that thing would have hit him,” Pitts added. “It’s not going to be a concussion. Not going to be ‘Oh no, I’m hurt, honey go to the hospital.’ They would be dead!”

Though this event is surely terrifying for those below, it’s not the first time a piece of an aircraft has fallen from the sky. In January of 2018, a car was struck by a plane engine part that fell during takeoff. In January of 2017, an engine cover fell during a turbulent flight, and in September of 2017, a broken Spirit plane rained hot metal over Detroit after a violent takeoff.

As for a solution to this airplane issue, the neighbors did offer up some advice: Check the planes and their doors more often.

“I think they should inspect the planes more often,” Lopez said. “Because we can’t be having that around! There are kids out here. What if another piece falls off and injures someone? "

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