Fully vaccinated tourists can skip pre-arrival testing by presenting their CDC vaccination card.

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Italy updated its entry requirements for American tourists this week, allowing them to avoid testing or quarantine measures upon arrival, according to Italy's Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation.

The new rules, which went into effect on Monday, allow fully vaccinated tourists from the United States to skip pre-arrival testing by presenting their white Centers for Disease Control and Prevention vaccination card, the ministry noted. The requirements comply with Italy's "Green certificate."

Unvaccinated travelers are still welcome but are required to show proof they contracted COVID-19 and recovered or show proof of a negative COVID-19 PCR or rapid antigen test taken within 48 hours of their departure.

Children under 6 years old are exempt from pre-departure testing.

All travelers must also fill out a passenger locator form prior to departure.

The updated entry requirements come as the U.S. was added to the European Union's safe travel list. It also comes weeks after Italy first opened to American tourists, but required visitors to travel on "COVID-free" flights with extensive pre-departure and post-arrival testing.

Tourists stroll at the St. Mark's Square on June 12, 2021 in Venice, Italy
Credit: Luca Zanon/Awakening/Getty

The ministry noted the COVID-tested flights will still comply with the new provisions as "Airlines are adapting to the new regulations."

In Italy, bars, restaurants, ice cream parlors, and pastry shops are currently open along with indoor and outdoor swimming pools, shops, beaches, and theme parks, according to the country's tourism site. Museums are also open on weekends with advance booking as well as open on weekdays with limited capacity.

Italy isn't alone in welcoming American tourists to Europe. Several countries - including France, Greece, Croatia, Denmark, and Spain - have welcomed U.S. travelers with vaccination or pre-arrival testing requirements in place.

While Europe is opening up, non-essential travel to America for non-U.S. citizens remains largely banned from several areas around the globe, including from the EU.

Alison Fox is a contributing writer for Travel + Leisure. When she's not in New York City, she likes to spend her time at the beach or exploring new destinations and hopes to visit every country in the world. Follow her adventures on Instagram.