U.S. travelers 6 and older must show proof they've been fully vaccinated or show proof they contracted COVID-19 and recovered between 28 days and six months before their trip.

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Germany lifted travel restrictions on American tourists on Sunday, saying willkommen to travelers once again.

To enter the country by air, U.S. travelers 6 and older must show proof they've been fully vaccinated or show proof they contracted COVID-19 and recovered between 28 days and six months before their trip, the German National Tourist Office shared with Travel + Leisure. Travelers can also show proof of a negative PCR test within 72 hours of their arrival or a rapid antigen test within 48 hours of arrival.

Those who choose to use their vaccination card must show a written or digital version of it, but a cellphone photo is not sufficient. Only vaccines approved by the European Medicines Agency are accepted, including Moderna, Pfizer/BioNTech, and Johnson & Johnson.

A few days after Germany eases travel restrictions for U.S. travelers, the country plans to welcome fully vaccinated travelers from several other countries, according to the German National Tourist Office.

The decision comes a week after Germany said the U.S. was no longer categorized as a risk area, waiving the requirement to digitally register for entry or quarantine on arrival. It also comes weeks after the country announced its plans to open to U.S. visitors.

Germany
Credit: Christophe Gateau/picture alliance via Getty Images

In May, Germany started easing restrictions, even allowing Biergartens to open, but has canceled its famed Oktoberfest celebrations in 2021 for the second year in a row.

Germany's reopening also comes as many countries in Europe have begun to ease border restrictions for American travelers with either vaccination or testing requirements in place, including Italy, Greece, France, and Spain.

The EU as a whole has added America to its safe travel list, putting it in the same company as countries like Australia, Israel, Singapore, Thailand, and New Zealand. By adding the U.S. to the list, the EU signaled member countries "should gradually lift the travel restrictions."

Alison Fox is a contributing writer for Travel + Leisure. When she's not in New York City, she likes to spend her time at the beach or exploring new destinations and hopes to visit every country in the world. Follow her adventures on Instagram.