Easyjet said the substance was not duct tape, but rather “high speed metallic tape.”

By Jamie Ducharme
December 02, 2017
Luke MacGregor/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Video footage circulating online shows an engineer repairing an Easyjet airplane’s engine with what looks like simple household duct tape.

The passenger, who captured video from inside the plane on Nov. 28, witnessed the repairman apparently remove tape that had become dislodged during an earlier flight, clean the area, then place new tape on the engine, the Daily Mail reports. According to his account, passengers on the Berlin-bound flight out of Amsterdam were told that the plane would be held until a “minimal technical fix” could be completed on the runway, according to the Daily Mail.

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Easyjet told the Daily Mail that the substance was not duct tape, but rather “high speed metallic tape,” a material that’s sometimes used to carry out temporary jet repairs.

“EasyJet occasionally uses this high speed metallic tape, which is always used in accordance with the approved aircraft manuals and repair processes, and in no way compromises the safety of the aircraft. The safety and wellbeing of passengers and crew is always EasyJet’s priority,” a spokesperson for the budget airline told the publication.

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While it may appear jarring, experts have confirmed that speed tape is a safe and common tool used in aircraft repairs. Pilot Patrick Smith, of AskThePilot.com, told the Independent that the scene captured in the passenger’s video is nothing to worry about.

“The type of tape [here] is a high-tech metallic tape, and it is used only for the temporary repair of superficial components—fairings, coverings and the like,” Smith said. “The idea of a plane ‘having its engine taped up,’ or anything similar, is absurd.”

The passenger who captured the footage last week seemed less sure. “It really seems that the tape was there for mechanical reasons and not just for the looks,” he said, according to AOL. He also alleged that the plane’s turbine was making a “ticking” noise and that the flight appeared not to have reached full height, AOL reports.

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