By Alison Fox
February 04, 2021
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Credit: IDA GULDBAEK ARENTSEN/Getty

Denmark is developing a digital vaccine passport that would allow vaccinated people to travel, according to reports, becoming the latest European country to do so.

Initially, the Scandinavian country plans to allow Danish citizens to see their vaccination status on a health website before the end of February, The Associated Press reported.

"It is absolutely crucial for us to be able to restart Danish society so that companies can get back on track. Many Danish companies are global companies with the whole world as a market," Finance Minister Morten Boedskov told the wire service during a news conference.

"It will be the extra passport that you will be able to have on your mobile phone that documents that you have been vaccinated," he added. "We can be among the first in the world to have it and can show it to the rest of the world."

The vaccine passport, developed with private businesses, would be initially geared toward travel, but officials said they would later consider other aspects of public life it could be used for.

Currently, those coming from the U.S. are not allowed to enter Denmark except in specific circumstances, including the country's "Sweetheart Declaration" exception under which "sweethearts", fiancees, and others with close relationships to legal Danish residents can reunite, according to the U.S. Embassy & Consulate in the Kingdom of Denmark.

Denmark isn't alone in looking to hand out vaccine passports to its citizens. Last week, Iceland said it would start issuing digital "vaccination certificates" to citizens who have received two vaccine shots as well as recognize vaccine passports from qualified incoming travelers. And Israel will look to issue "green passports" to vaccinated citizens, allowing them to visit public spaces like restaurants.

In addition, several countries have started welcoming travelers who are fully vaccinated or allowing them to skip mandatory quarantines, including the Seychelles and Romania. And several cruise lines -- including two in the U.S. -- said they will require passengers to be fully vaccinated before boarding.

Alison Fox is a contributing writer for Travel + Leisure. When she's not in New York City, she likes to spend her time at the beach or exploring new destinations and hopes to visit every country in the world. Follow her adventures on Instagram.