Regardless of vaccination status, Americans will still have to show proof of a paid accommodation in a hotel, camp, private rental, or rented vessel.

By Alison Fox
April 02, 2021
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Fully vaccinated travelers from any country will now be able to travel to Croatia without the need to get tested or self-isolate upon arrival, according to the government, becoming the latest country to welcome tourists who have received the jab.

Tourists who are 14 days out from receiving both doses of a two-dose vaccine or one dose of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine will be exempt from having to show a negative test, according to Croatia's Ministry of the Interior. This applies to American tourists as well as other third-country nationals.

Regardless of vaccination status, Americans will still have to show proof of a paid accommodation in a hotel, camp, private rental, or rented vessel. A reservation is not sufficient and must be paid in advance, according to the U.S. Embassy in Croatia.

Croatia — known for its gorgeous beaches, limestone cliffs, and Game of Thrones filming spots — welcomes U.S. tourists who are not vaccinated as well, but requires them to get tested before arriving. These travelers need to show a negative PCR or rapid antigen COVID-19 test taken within 48 hours of arriving, or show proof they have contracted COVID-19 and recovered within the last six months. Children under 7 years old with a parent or guardian are exempt.

Croatia
Credit: Dominik Bindl/Getty Images

If travelers arrive with a negative rapid test and stay longer than 10 days, the test will need to be repeated within those 10 days.

Alternatively, travelers can opt to get tested upon arrival, but must self-isolate until the results are ready.

U.S. tourists who visit Croatia will also be required to get tested within three days of boarding a flight back to America. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends travelers get tested again when they arrive home and quarantine for seven days.

Croatia is the latest country to welcome vaccinated tourists, exempting them from quarantine or testing requirements, as travelers are beginning to take to the skies in record numbers.

Alison Fox is a contributing writer for Travel + Leisure. When she's not in New York City, she likes to spend her time at the beach or exploring new destinations and hopes to visit every country in the world. Follow her adventures on Instagram.