Other destinations. that now have the new designation include Haiti, Kosovo, Lebanon, Morocco, and Sint Maarten.

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention raised six more destinations to its highest travel warning level on Monday, including popular vacation hotspot the Bahamas.

The agency raised the Bahamas to a "Level 4," warning travelers they should avoid heading to the island nation, especially if they are unvaccinated. Destinations are classified as a "Level 4" if there are 500 COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people.

Similarly, the Department of State issued a travel advisory on Monday mirroring the CDC's message.

"Because of the current situation in the Bahamas, even fully vaccinated travelers may be at risk for getting and spreading COVID-19 variants," the CDC wrote in its advisory. "Travelers should follow recommendations or requirements in the Bahamas, including wearing a mask and staying 6 feet apart from others."

The Bahamas, which recently implemented a vaccine mandate for cruise ships docking there, welcomes Americans and requires them to provide proof of a negative PCR or antigen test, depending on their vaccination status. On Aug. 21, the country expanded a nightly curfew.

Bahamas
Credit: Roberto Machado Noa/LightRocket via Getty Images

In addition to the Bahamas, the CDC raised five more destinations to "Level 4": Haiti, Kosovo, Lebanon, Morocco, and Sint Maarten.

The agency has raised several countries and territories around the world to its highest COVID-19 warning level in recent weeks, including France, Israel, Greece, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The CDC has also waived warnings on a few destinations, lowering both India and Canada to "Level 2," indicating a "moderate" level of coronavirus transmission.

While the CDC and State Department update travel warnings based on epidemiological situations, the U.S. as a whole continues to heavily restrict international travel. Last week, the U.S. extended the land border closure with Canada and Mexico another month, and non-essential travel for non-U.S. citizens remains restricted from several destinations, including the United Kingdom and European Union.

In the past, the White House has pointed to the spread of the highly contagious delta variant and said that policy isn't likely to change just yet.

Alison Fox is a contributing writer for Travel + Leisure. When she's not in New York City, she likes to spend her time at the beach or exploring new destinations and hopes to visit every country in the world. Follow her adventures on Instagram.