Gyms, places of worship, non-essential office work, salons, and malls in 30 counties were ordered to shut down.

By Alison Fox
July 14, 2020
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Brent Stirton/Getty

California Gov. Gavin Newsom closed down large swaths of the state on Monday amid rising COVID-19 cases there, walking back openings of restaurants, bars, movie theaters, and more.

Newsom ordered restaurants to shut down dine-in service statewide as well as closed wineries and tasting rooms, movie theaters, zoos, museums, and entertainment venues like bowling alleys, according to the California government website. Additionally, all bars and breweries were told to close unless they offer food for sit-down outdoor dining.

“We’re moving back into a modification mode of our original stay at home order, but doing so utilizing… a dimmer switch, not an on and off switch,” Newsom said during a news conference, adding: “This virus is not going away anytime soon… this continues to be a deadly disease, this continues to be a disease that puts people in our ICU’s, in our hospitals, and is currently putting a strain on our hospital system and in our ICU’s.”

The order comes as California has seen a rise in COVID-19 cases over the past several weeks, recording more than 329,000 confirmed cases in total, according to the California Department of Public Health. Of those, more than 109,900 have been reported in the last two weeks.

There has also been a 27.8 percent increase in COVID-19-related hospitalizations compared to the previous 14 days, according to the state.

Beyond the statewide closures, Newsom ordered 30 counties in the state to also shut down indoor operations including at gyms, places of worship, non-essential office work, personal care services (like nail salons and hair salons), and malls. The “targeted” closures affect counties like Los Angeles County, Marin County, Orange County, and Napa County.

Masks continue to remain mandatory inside indoor public spaces throughout the state.

The newest lockdown measures follow the opening of several industries in the state as California had begun moving into Stage 3 of its reopening plan. Higher-risk businesses like movie theaters had previously been allowed to open. The state’s initial stay-at-home order was first issued on March 19.