The new policy goes into effect on Jan. 29.
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Broadway will require all theatergoers 5 years old and older to show proof of vaccination to see a show starting later this month.

The new policy, which will go into effect on Jan. 29, will require all ticket holders 5 and older to show proof they have received the second dose (or first dose for Johnson & Johnson) of a COVID-19 vaccine at least 14 days before entering a theater, The Broadway League announced this week. Those who have received a second dose, or dose of Johnson & Johnson, less than two weeks before a performance must also show proof of a negative test.

Currently, Broadway allows children 5 to 11 to attend a show if they show proof of a negative COVID-19 PCR test taken within 72 hours of the performance start time or show proof of a negative rapid antigen test taken within six hours of the performance.

Going forward, guests 18 and older will also have to present a government-issued photo ID, while guests 12 to 17 years old must also show a government-issued or school-issued ID, but a photo is not required. Ticket holders 5 to 11 years old can only enter a theater when accompanied by a vaccinated adult.

Further, international guests can attend a show if they have been vaccinated with two doses of any "mix and match" FDA or WHO-approved COVID-19 vaccine.

The New Amsterdam Theatre home to "Aladdin" on broadway
Credit: Alexi Rosenfeld/Getty Images

In addition to vaccine requirements, theatergoers are required to wear masks except when actively eating and drinking.

"The owners and operators of all 41 Broadway theatres in New York City will continue to require vaccinations for audience members, as well as performers, backstage crew, and theatre staff, for all performances through April 30, 2022," The Broadway League wrote in its advisory. "Masks will continue to be required for audiences inside the theatre, except while actively eating or drinking in designated locations."

The strict protocols were first implemented when Broadway lifted the curtain on shows last year. But COVID-19 outbreaks have since stymied the industry with several shows forced to cancel performances in recent weeks.

Alison Fox is a contributing writer for Travel + Leisure. When she's not in New York City, she likes to spend her time at the beach or exploring new destinations and hopes to visit every country in the world. Follow her adventures on Instagram.