By Andrea Romano
January 08, 2018
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Credit: Zhang Peng/Getty Images

On Saturday morning, passengers at John F. Kennedy International Airport were still feeling the pain of the massive “bomb cyclone” snowstorm, which hit the east coast on Thursday.

At the time, most of JFK was still shut down due to the weather conditions and was slammed with a backlog of delayed and rescheduled flights. To make matters worse, the icy weather led to other chaotic incidents like planes colliding on the tarmac.

Many passengers had to wait hours for their planes to be assigned a gate after landing at the airport so they could disembark, and faced even more delays while waiting for their luggage to arrive at baggage claim.

On Sunday, a water main break in a baggage claim area caused even more chaos and delays. According to ABC News, many passengers were told to come back when their luggage was ready instead of waiting around.

But people on AirChina Flight CA989 from Beijing to New York were especially living out many travelers’ worst nightmares after landing from their 14-hour flight at JFK only to wait another seven hours on the tarmac before they could deplane.

Some passengers were tweeting through their experience, many of whom were asking AirChina for refunds and calling out the airline for lack of customer service.

Some passengers reported that the plane had been stuck on the tarmac for so long that the cabin crew ran out of water to keep passengers hydrated while they waited.

Passengers seemed to remain calm on the plane despite the many issues, including being told after waiting five hours that they could deplane only to be told a few minutes later that there would be more delays.

Once AirChina passengers officially deplaned, some passengers tweeted that baggage claim was also a disaster.

According to ABC News, Port Authority is helping to aid JFK operations by providing portable staircases and buses to transport passengers from the airfield to the terminal. But it looks like the airport could use a few more reinforcements until the winter ice clears.