A 'Super Blood Flower Moon' Eclipse Will Be in the Sky This Weekend — Here's When To Watch

Get ready for a beautiful total lunar eclipse on a Sunday evening.

The full moon, known as a super flower blood moon, is seen during its maximum lunar eclipse phase, in Sydney, Australia, on May 26, 2021.
The full moon, known as a super flower blood moon, is seen during its maximum lunar eclipse phase, in Sydney, Australia, on May 26, 2021. . Photo: Steven Saphore/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

On Sunday evening a full "super blood flower moon" eclipse will drift into Earth's shadow in space and be in full view across the United States.

During that time it will be as if the light from a thousand sunsets are projected onto the moon's surface, which will glow an eerie orangey-copper red color for anyone in North and South America.

Although there's another almost identical event on Nov. 16, another 'blood moon' eclipse after that will not occur again until 2025, according to Time and Date. Additionally, as cloud cover can be unpredictable – particularly in November – May's 'totality' is not something you want to miss because it's also a super moon, Earth Sky reported.

The good news here is that the entirety of North America and South America will be able to see this eclipse. It's a global event, so it will be visible at exactly the same time from anywhere on the planet— it's only the time-zones that determine when you should take a look, according to astronomy site SkyandTelescope.org.

  • 11:29 p.m.-12:53 a.m. EDT on Sunday May 15-Monday, 16, 2022
  • 10:29-11:53 p.m. CDT on Sunday May 15, 2022
  • 9:29-10:53 p.m. MDT on Sunday May 15, 2022
  • 8:29-9:53 p.m. PDT on Sunday May 15, 2022

How to Watch

All you need are your own eyes and the patience to look at the Moon for a few minutes. You don't need to be anywhere particularly dark, though do move away from any sources of light that might shine directly into your eyes. Although they're not required to enjoy the event any pair of binoculars will get you a fabulous close-up of the reddish lunar surface.

How to Photograph it

The Moon is tiny in the sky so don't expect a masterpiece, but it is possible to get a souvenir shot of the 'Blood Moon' using a smartphone. If you have a 'Moon mode' on your smartphone then give that a try (it's found on some Android devices). If not then put your smartphone on a tripod, lock your focus and exposure on the Moon by pressing it on the screen, then take the photo. It will likely go into 'night mode' and probably take 10 seconds or longer to take the photo. If you want to play with the manual settings then experiment with longer exposures up to 30 seconds.

Jamie Carter is editor of WhenIsTheNextEclipse.com.

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