By Andrea Romano
July 24, 2019

A 9-year-old girl was treated for injuries after being charged by bison at Yellowstone National Park on Monday, USA Today reported.

A video circulating online shows the girl tossed high into the air by the animal. She was part of a group of about 50 tourists that were standing between five and 10 feet away from the animal for several minutes near Observation Point Trail, according to a news release from the National Park Service.

Tammi Mild/Getty Images

According to CBS, the girl was from Odessa, Florida, but there is no other identifying information. She was taken to Old Faithful Lodge with her family to be treated by emergency workers and later taken to a local clinic, according to USA Today. The details of her injuries are not clear.

Yellowstone is famous for its bison, but that doesn’t mean that tourists shouldn’t take every precaution when encountering them. Though these herds live in a popular tourist area, they are still wild animals. Yellowstone National Park has issued warnings in the past for tourists not to get too close to the bison, especially after injuries have occurred in the park.

One such warning included a pledge in 2017 that asked tourists to “Practice safe selfies by never approaching animals to take a picture.” Getting too close to take pictures with animals have often contributed to accidents.

According to the NPS, tourists should not be any closer than 25 yards (75 feet) to most wildlife within Yellowstone National Park. Predators like bears and wolves should be maintained at a distance of 100 yards (300 feet).

Anywhere you go, whether it’s Yellowstone or elsewhere, there’s always a right and wrong way to approach local wildlife. It’s important for travelers to do their research and pay attention to any warnings that might be posted at their destination. Any place that allows encounters with wildlife must have strict rules in order to keep both visitors and animals safe.

Luckily, the girl was released after examination and is recovering. An investigation is currently ongoing, according to the NPS.

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