Map
Via Dante Alighieri, Lucca, Italy

Firouz Galdo, an Iranian-born architect working in Rome, was brought in to create a contemporary space full of light, wood, and pewter—the whole thing could easily sit atop a Hong Kong skyscraper. Grano Salis, full of young locals, is certainly in the pro-kebab camp. Its website weighs in on the controversy, noting that Italian cuisine is flooded with foreign influences and that there’s not a whale of difference between, say, sashimi and crudo or, for that matter, kebabs and the Italian spiedini. The interior of Grano Salis is covered in mottoes such as mangia come pensi (“Eat like you think”), and thoughtful is the best way to describe the restaurant’s professional and knowledgeable waitstaff, who will say things like: “The octopus we saw today at the market was too small. We didn’t like it.”

Restaurant
Grano Salis

Firouz Galdo, an Iranian-born architect working in Rome, was brought in to create a contemporary space full of light, wood, and pewter—the whole thing could easily sit atop a Hong Kong skyscraper. Grano Salis, full of young locals, is certainly in the pro-kebab camp. Its website weighs in on the controversy, noting that Italian cuisine is flooded with foreign influences and that there’s not a whale of difference between, say, sashimi and crudo or, for that matter, kebabs and the Italian spiedini. The interior of Grano Salis is covered in mottoes such as mangia come pensi (“Eat like you think”), and thoughtful is the best way to describe the restaurant’s professional and knowledgeable waitstaff, who will say things like: “The octopus we saw today at the market was too small. We didn’t like it.”