Though weather is expected to be "outstanding" for the festival's anticipated dates, the inclement weather days before has made it impossible for the festival's organizers to drive and park vehicles.

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General view during Bonnaroo
Credit: Katie Stratton/Getty

Bonnaroo will have to wait yet another year.

In a last-minute announcement Tuesday, the Manchester, Tennessee festival announced that it will no longer take place due to the effects of extreme weather from Hurricane Ida. Bonnaroo was originally set to commence on Sept. 2 and end Sept. 5 this weekend.

"We are absolutely heartbroken to announce that we must cancel Bonnaroo," the festival's announcement read. "While this weekend's weather looks outstanding, currently Centeroo is waterlogged in many areas, the ground is incredibly saturated on our tollbooth paths, and the campgrounds are flooded to the point that we are unable to drive in or park vehicles safely."

"We have done everything in our power to try to keep the show moving forward, but Mother Nature has dealt us a tremendous amount of rain over the past 24 hours, and we have run out of options to try to make the event happen safely and in a way that lives up to the Bonnaroo experience," the statement continued.

Bonnaroo was set to feature headlining performances by the Foo Fighters, Megan Thee Stallion, Lizzo, Tame Impala, Tyler, the Creator and Rufus du Sol.

Those with tickets to the festival will be able to receive refunds for their purchases within 30 days.

"Please find ways to safely gather with your Bonnaroo community and continue to radiate positivity during this disappointing time," the statement ended. "WE WILL SEE YOU ON THE FARM IN JUNE 2022!"

2020's festival — which was scheduled to feature the likes of Lizzo, Miley Cyrus and Lana Del Rey — was postponed and later canceled due to the coronavirus. The festival typically takes place in mid-June.

Earlier this week, the Tennessean reported that organizers deemed parts of the campgrounds "unusable" and that it would be forced to reduce its "camping capacity."

This story originally appeared on People.com.