By Andy Kiersz / BusinessInsider.com
October 24, 2019
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This article originally appeared on BusinessInsider.com.

In 2000, the world wide web was barely a decade old, and the first big internet tech boom was only beginning to threaten incumbent industries. Watching videos at home and listening to music still involved walking to an actual store, and the overwhelming majority of Americans got their news from TV or print newspapers.

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A lot has changed since the turn of the millennium, and to take a look at how the economy has been transformed, we found 20 jobs that employed hundreds of thousands of people in 2000 that are only a fraction of that size today.

Using data from the 2000 Census and the 2017 American Community Survey assembled by the Minnesota Population Center's Integrated Public Use Microdata Series project, we looked at what industries had the biggest percent drops in employment between then and now.

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For our analysis, we looked at industries that had at least 100,000 people employed in 2000. We also excluded military branches and a handful of "catchall" industrial groupings used by the Census, instead focusing on specific industries in the civilian sector.

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Textiles and apparel manufacturing, non-digital publishing, and certain types of retail stores that have been replaced by online alternatives all show up on the list. These industries have been hit particularly hard by changes in global trade and the rise of the internet in the 21st century.

Here are the industries, along with the number of employees in 2000 and 2017:

20. Publishing (except newspapers and software)

397,320 people were employed in 2000, falling to 251,952 in 2017 (a 37% drop).

19. Toys, amusement, and sporting-goods manufacturing

141,372 people were employed in 2000, falling to 87,828 in 2017 (a 38% drop).

18. Electrical-goods wholesalers

389,896 people were employed in 2000, falling to 239,178 in 2017 (a 39% drop).

17. Petroleum and petroleum-product wholesalers

156,080 people were employed in 2000, falling to 94,992 in 2017 (a 39% drop).

16. Wired telecommunications carriers

933,409 people were employed in 2000, falling to 564,715 in 2017 (a 39% drop).

15. Gift, novelty, and souvenir shops

256,873 people were employed in 2000, falling to 150,708 in 2017 (a 41% drop).

14. Metal forging and stamping

126,024 people were employed in 2000, falling to 73,716 in 2017 (a 42% drop).

13. Retail florists

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170,668 people were employed in 2000, falling to 97,097 in 2017 (a 43% drop).

12. Commercial and service-industry machinery manufacturing

155,142 people were employed in 2000, falling to 84,420 in 2017 (a 46% drop).

11. Cut-and-sew apparel manufacturing

374,647 people were employed in 2000, falling to 199,462 in 2017 (a 47% drop).

10. Communications, audio, and video equipment manufacturing

268,419 people were employed in 2000, falling to 135,950 in 2017 (a 49% drop).

9. Fabric mills

183,948 people were employed in 2000, falling to 92,889 in 2017 (a 50% drop).

8. Paper and paper-product wholesalers

122,214 people were employed in 2000, falling to 60,222 in 2017 (a 51% drop).

7. Foundries

188,189 people were employed in 2000, falling to 88,234 in 2017 (a 53% drop).

6. Newspaper publishers

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519,981 people were employed in 2000, falling to 208,549 in 2017 (a 60% drop).

5. Textile product mills

201,094 people were employed in 2000, falling to 77,263 in 2017 (a 62% drop).

4. Computer and peripheral equipment manufacturing

425,694 people were employed in 2000, falling to 146,624 in 2017 (a 66% drop).

3. Aerospace product and parts manufacturing

233,559 people were employed in 2000, falling to 66.921 in 2017 (a 71% drop).

2. Music stores

141,262 people were employed in 2000, falling to 39,687 in 2017 (a 72% drop).

1. Video-tape and disk rental

Andrew H. Walker/Getty Images

127,828 people were employed in 2000, falling to 12,780 in 2017 (a 90% drop).

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