The Four Seasons Hotel New Orleans is a sight to behold.
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The Four Seasons Hotel and Private Residences New Orleans is more than a hotel opening for the city. For New Orleanians, it's a beacon of progress and continued recovery, delivered in the form of a 34-story luxury property that towers high above the Mississippi River.

The Four Seasons New Orleans interiors of bars, food, rooms
Credit: Christian Horan

Originally built in 1967 as the International Trade Mart by modernist architect Edward Durell Stone, the landmark tower was more commonly known as the World Trade Center—named in 1968. The once-prominent office building sat unoccupied for a decade prior to undergoing the over half-billion dollar, three-year renovation.

The Four Seasons New Orleans interiors of bars, food, rooms
Credit: Christian Horan

The compass-shaped tower is constructed with four sections that align with the cardinal points of North, South, East, and West--a homage to navigating the river. The Chandelier Bar serves as the showpiece, anchored in the lobby where guests sip cocktails under the custom chandelier made from 15,000 Bohemian crystals. "The twinkling, reflective movement of the chandelier creates a layered mood in a room that is subdivided by shutter screens made of oak, iron, and curated artwork," says Bill Rooney of Bill Rooney Studio, who designed the hotel's interiors.

And because it's New Orleans, the gustatory offerings are plentiful. Designed by London-based Alexander Waterworth Interiors, the lobby-level restaurant, Miss River, is helmed by the beloved local chef Alon Shaya of Uptown's Saba. The salt-crusted snapper is served tableside and meant for sharing, as is the whole carved buttermilk-fried chicken. An "imbibe cart" slowly circles the scalloped floor tiling where servers pour glasses of bubbly or offer an after-dinner digestif.

The Four Seasons New Orleans interiors of bars, food, rooms
Credit: Christian Horan
The Four Seasons New Orleans interiors of bars, food, rooms
Credit: Christian Horan

Each of the 341 guest rooms (also designed by Bill Rooney Studio) is a serene chamber with a fresh palette of white and pale greys. Mid-century modern white-oak furniture compliments shiplap walls, and beds are dressed with the signature Four Seasons linens and set against a wall relief of sculpted Magnolia flowers, and the Carrara marble bathrooms have large oval soaking tubs. "The guest room is formed through references found in nature. With hints of local culture and influenced by the patterns found in New Orleans gardens," explains Rooney. 

Opening this fall are the crescent-shaped rooftop swimming pool, beauty atelier spa and fitness center, and chef Donald Link's Chemin a la Mer restaurant. fourseasons.com; doubles from $375.