The latest property from Family Coppola Hideaways is Oscar-worthy.

By Paul Brady
Updated March 13, 2020
Couresty of Cassa Zenda

Talk about the sort of place we’d all like to go right now.

The stunning Cassa Zenda is a new four-bungalow retreat on the banks of Lake Izabal in Guatemala. It’s also the latest property from Family Coppola Hideaways, the hospitality company spearheaded by iconic director Francis Ford Coppola.

The company now has seven escapes around the world, including Turtle Inn and La Lancha. Some, including Cassa Zenda, are available only to one group at a time — like private vacation villas — but come with the staff and service you’d typically find at a full-service hotel or resort. At Cassa Zenda, for example, the staff includes “a concierge and house manager, house butler, private chef, housekeeping service, and boat captain,” Coppola Hideaways says.

Couresty of Cassa Zenda
Couresty of Cassa Zenda

On property, guests can chill in thatched-roof bungalows, swim in the saltwater pool, take yoga classes, or explore the lake by kayak, jet ski, or Cassa Zenda’s 38-foot motor yacht. That being said, the lodge is best thought of as an entry point to this corner of a destination many Americans have yet to see. “We love the country of Guatemala, and we’d like to see it visited much more,” says Christine Gaudenzi, director of sales and marketing for the Family Coppola Hideaways.

Couresty of Cassa Zenda

To that end, there are countless activities in the surrounding area. “We knew instantly that Cassa Zenda would complement our portfolio of unique Central American hideaways,” says the general manager of the nearby Turtle Inn, Martin Krediet, in a statement. “It’s a journey that takes travelers to sea, river, and lakes with excursions to extraordinary Mayan ruins, waterfalls, and local villages, all accessed by boat through the enchanting Rio Dulce.”

Couresty of Cassa Zenda

For up to eight guests, stays start at $3,500 a night, with additional guests, up to 16 total, at $200 per person, inclusive of meals and “many water toys,” Cassa Zenda says.

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