To reach the top of the volcano — and the pizza — visitors can either hike or saddle up on horseback.
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When it comes to pizza, there's Chicago deep dish, New York thin slice, Hawaiian, Italian wood-fired, and now, Guatemalan lava.

Chef David Garcia — the mastermind behind Pizza Pacaya pizzeria — has manage to cook the popular food entirely with heat from flowing lava on top of Guatemala's Pacaya volcano. The unconventional eatery brings tourists from across the world to the active volcano for a pie.

"One day, I prepared a pizza, took it to the volcanic rocks, and in 14 minutes, it was ready," Garcia told AccuWeather, of how Pizza Pacaya came to be. "The high temps from the nearby lava gave it an exclusive taste and an amazing crunch. I told myself, 'This needs to continue.'"

David Garcia prepares a pizza to cook on the lava rivers in Guatemala,
David Garcia prepares a pizza to cook on the lava rivers that come down from the Pacaya volcano at the Cerro Chino hill in San Vicente Pacaya municipality, Guatemala,
| Credit: Johan ORDONEZ/Getty Images

The dining experience is unique to say the least.

To reach the Pacaya volcano, visitors must endure a bumpy ride through one of southern Guatemala's thick forests. Once at the foot of the volcano, visitors can either hike on foot or saddle up and trek on horseback. At the top, they place their orders with Garcia, and the pizza is usually ready to eat about 10 minutes later.

a pizza being cooked on a lava river in Guatemala
View of a pizza being cooked on a lava river that comes down from the Pacaya volcano at the Cerro Chino hill in San Vicente Pacaya municipality, Guatemala
| Credit: Johan ORDONEZ/Getty Images

Guests are then invited to sit on blankets strewn about the sharp, black volcanic rock and enjoy their pizza while taking in the vista from the top of the volcano. 

For those uncertain about the safety of hiking to an active volcano, there is no need to worry, Pacaya is safe to traverse, a local guide told CBS.

Garcia cooks the pizza in rectangular pans and typically serves it in square slices. Visitors can choose from options like pepperoni and salami, although Garcia's favorite is a prosciutto pie.

As far as Garcia is concerned, he is the only person in the world cooking pizza this way, he told the network.

David Garcia on the lava rivers from the Pacaya volcano in Guatemala
David Garcia speaks after cooking pizza on the lava rivers that come down from the Pacaya volcano at the Cerro Chino hill in San Vicente Pacaya municipality, Guatemala,
| Credit: Johan ORDONEZ/Getty Images

There are, of course, certain hurdles to cooking on a volcano that more traditional pizza chefs don't have to face. Garcia must keep an eye on his pizzas to make sure that they don't float away in a river of lava. He also must wear heat-protective clothing so that he can tend to his pies in the extreme heat.  

A small pie will set you back about $35 while a larger one is priced at $55. Visitors must make a reservation in advance, as you are only allowed to hike up the volcano with an established guide. You can DM Garcia on Instagram or Facebook to reserve your spot. 

Cailey Rizzo is a contributing writer for Travel + Leisure, currently based in Brooklyn. You can find her on Twitter, Instagram, or at caileyrizzo.com.