94-year-old Olive Veronesi loved her delivery so much, Coors wants to help out more beer drinkers in quarantine.

By Andrea Romano
Updated June 06, 2020
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Could you use a beer? Don’t worry, you’re not alone.

The ongoing coronavirus crisis has been hard on everyone in different ways — mentally, emotionally, physically, and even financially. Whether you’re self-quarantining at home, dealing with extra responsibilities to take care of your family, or you’re an essential worker on the front lines of the pandemic, this outbreak has earned us all some time to relax when its over.

Courtesy of Coors Light

Now, Coors Light is swooping in to provide people with a little extra bonus during this difficult time. Just like the beer brand delivered 150 cans of beer to locked-down 93-year-old Olive Veronesi when she needed more beer, Coors wants to do the same for you.

The beer company’s newest initiative, #CouldUseABeer on Twitter is offering up to 500,000 free beers to people who are nominated by their friends and family as someone who could really use a cold one.

Coors is asking its followers to tweet at them the name of the person they would like to nominate and a reason why they could use some free beer using the hashtag #CouldUseABeer. Maybe it’s your parent, your significant other, or just someone you’re grateful to have in your life during this difficult time. The company has a pinned tweet with a prompt to enter on Twitter to make it easy for you.

If chosen, in order to cash in on a free six-pack, a beer purchase up to $10.99 is required and the purchaser must send in their receipt to receive a rebate. So it’s not quite like 15 cases showing up at your door, like in Olive Veronesi’s case, but free beer is free beer, after all. No matter how you get it.

Your offer may vary by state, so be sure to check out the rules, terms and conditions on the promotion’s website. This offer is open until June 1 and winners must send in their receipts by June 15.

For more information, visit the Coors Light Twitter page.