From Bad Bunny to Taylor Swift, here's what kept people "moving" while staying still this year.

By Andrea Romano
December 01, 2020
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Credit: Spotify

This year has certainly been a unique one. Besides being physically cut off from our friends and family due to the pandemic, people are finding new ways to work, stay fit, and have, dare we say, fun.

And through it all, Spotify has been there to provide millions of hours of entertainment to stream anywhere we go –– even if it’s just to the grocery store.

With 2020 being nearly over, Spotify has released its annual year-in-review, 2020 Wrapped. This run down of the most popular artists, albums, songs, playlists, and podcasts is a window into how 320 million people enjoyed audio entertainment.

At the top of the music list, Bad Bunny takes away the number one spot as most streamed artist, with 8.3 billion streams in 2020. His album, "YHLQMDLG," also took the top spot as most-streamed album, with over 3.3 billion streams. Drake, J Balvin, rapper Juice WRLD (who passed away in 2019), and The Weeknd rounded out the top five. Juice WRLD won top artist in the U.S. while Billie Eilish defended her title as the most-streamed female artist for the second year in a row, followed by Taylor Swift, Ariana Grande, Dua Lipa, and Halsey, respectively.

While The Weeknd is the fifth top artists, his song “Blinding Lights” wins as most-streamed song of the year, with almost 1.6 billion streams. Tones And I’s “Dance Monkey,” Roddy Ricch’s “The Box,” Imanbek and SAINt JHN’s “Roses - Imanbek Remix,” and Dua Lipa’s “Don’t Start Now” make up the top five.

In podcasting news, The Joe Rogan Experience took the number one spot for most popular podcast of the year globally, followed by TED Talks Daily, and The Michelle Obama Podcast. In the U.S. alone, NPR News Now took the top spot, meaning lots of listeners were looking to stay informed this year. The comedy/advice show Call Her Daddy took spot number five. Overall, Society & Culture and Comedy were the top two genres of podcasts people were listening to. 

Overall, Spotify’s report says that there was a 1,400 percent increase in work-from-home playlists, as well as a 430 percent increase for “gardening” playlists and a 40 percent increase for “cleaning” playlists. In addition, nearly 65,000 users created a “Black Lives Matter” playlist.

For more information or to check out more stats from the report, visit Spotify’s For The Record blog.

Andrea Romano is a freelance writer in New York City. Follow her on Twitter @theandrearomano.