Darrell Hartman headshot
Darrell Hartman headshot

Darrell Hartman

With more than 17 years as a freelance journalist, Darrell Hartman has contributed to publications including The Wall Street Journal, The Financial Times, Condé Nast Traveler, Travel + Leisure, and Bloomberg Businessweek. He has done copywriting and editorial work for close to 100 lifestyle brands and is a producer of several award-winning short documentaries.
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To determine this year’s standard-bearers for responsible tourism, we scoured the globe—from a private island in Cambodia to a Peruvian village on the verge of a travel boom. Here, all the winners, plus 20 trip ideas so you can experience their efforts firsthand, five of our favorite innovators, and the results of our Facebook poll on going green.
Just because you booked a standard room, doesn’t mean you have to stay in one. T+L gives you seven ways to sleep better.
Hotel rates have continued to fall in many U.S. hubs during the past year. For the best deals, look to these destinations, where room prices have dropped the most.*
Want to get to your final destination faster? Savvy frequent fliers share their travel secrets.
From Beijing to Tokyo, hotel restaurants are still among the best places to eat on the continent. Here, six noteworthy newcomers.
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A rainforest alliance. A restored garden. A LEED-certified hotel chain.Evidence that travel can change the world.
In our second annual guide to hotels, T+L looks at the current hotel landscape and where to find the best values, avoid hidden room fees, score an upgrade, maximize your loyalty program points, use the latest mobile apps, and more.
From Beijing to Tokyo, hotel restaurants are still among the best places to eat on the continent. Here, six noteworthy newcomers.
A rainforest alliance. A restored garden. A LEED-certified hotel chain.Evidence that travel can change the world.
In our second annual guide to hotels, T+L looks at the current hotel landscape and where to find the best values, avoid hidden room fees, score an upgrade, maximize your loyalty program points, use the latest mobile apps, and more.
For the latest deals and perks available at a hotel, sign up to follow the property on Twitter. Here’s what you’ll find.
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New smart-phone apps allow you to find a good hotel deal, reserve a room, manage your points, and more.
Despite the financial downturn, hotels have been opening across the country this year. Here, the 10 cities with the most new rooms.*
Here, T+L’s short list of the season’s screenings and must-see events around the globe.
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As concern for the environment grows, travelers are increasingly looking for ways to lessen their carbon footprint without having to rough it à la Swiss Family Robinson. With that in mind, Travel + Leisure found four hotels chock full of luxury which, despite their relative infancy—they’ve all been open for less than two years—are already green-certified by The Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED), and a fifth is close to certification. LEED is a third-party program that not only designates buildings as green but also provides businesses with the resources and know-how to make the necessary steps to go green. Becoming a LEED-certified hotel is quite a feat, especially when you consider that there are only 1,900 buildings—and we’re not just talking hotels here—around the globe that have met the conditions and necessary standards for true green certification. Without asking guests to do away with luxuries or amenities, these hotels found a way to provide them while still keeping the environment in mind. Want proof?California’s Venice Beach Eco Cottages features organic linens and custom—and surprisingly chic—décor accented with reclaimed objects and recycled materials (think birdcages, old-fashioned milk jugs). Another, the Stowe Mountain Lodge in Vermont, was mostly built from, and uses, materials and ingredients found within a 200-mile radius—from the Adirondack granite it quarried for its lobby to the locally tapped maple syrup it uses to braise short ribs at its restaurant. The Lodge at Sun Ranch in Montana, which only accommodates a maximum of 18 guests on their 26,000 acres at any one time, has the space to expand but chooses instead not to encroach on land still inhabited by wild elk and wolves. That being said, these hotels not only excel at being green, they do it without making guests give anything up…well, except for a few CFCs.
Tough economic times breed creative thinking, so we asked five travel-industry insiders to tell us where to find value right now.
Do Dakar
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The capital of Senegal lures in-the-know travelers to its lively streets—and into its tucked-away boutiques. Darrell Hartman shares his finds from a recent trip.