"We’re creating the Rockefeller Center of Queens.”

By Alison Fox
November 15, 2019
Courtesy of TWA Hotel

Combining nostalgia and winter vibes, an ice rink will open at the mid-century modern TWA Hotel later this month, allowing visitors to John F. Kennedy Airport to go for a spin amid the planes taking off and landing around them.

The runway rink, which will sit in the shadow of the hotel’s 1958 Lockheed Constellation Connie airplane/cocktail lounge, will open Nov. 30 through the end of February. The rink, which stands at 56 by 44 feet, is made with 3,500 gallons of frozen New York City tap water (which many New Yorkers — this one included — will vow is the best anywhere).

“Normally, when you hear about ice at the airport, it’s not good news,” Tyler Morse, the CEO and managing partner of the hotel’s owner and operator MCR/MORSE Development, said in a statement. “But in this case, people can get excited about a frozen tarmac at JFK — we’re creating the Rockefeller Center of Queens.”

When not skating on the icy rink at JFK, which measures two to three inches thick, visitors can enjoy old-fashioned candy like Snow-Caps, keeping with the spirit of the TWA Hotel.

The hotel itself opened in May in the previously shuttered terminal that was designed by renowned architect Eero Saarinen in the 1960s and served Trans World Airlines until 2001. The period touches like the penny-tile floors, split-flap boards and chili pepper-red carpeting transport visitors to a romanticized era of flying.

And in the ultimate celebration of the Jet Age, the hotel features a vintage plane-turned cocktail bar serving drinks like the Old Fashioned and Shirley Temples.

Skating is open seven days a week and costs $15 for adults and $10 for kids under 12. If you didn’t bring your ice skates to the airport (and we don’t blame you with baggage allowances constantly shrinking), you can rent them for up to $10.

The rink is open Monday through Thursday from 4 p.m. to 9 p.m., Friday from 4 p.m. to 10 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.

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