Celebrations start early at 5 a.m. ET on Facebook Live.

By Cailey Rizzo
June 18, 2020
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Even though Sweden's Midsummer holiday may look a bit different this year due to COVID-19, its virtual celebration will be welcoming revelers from all over the world.

While the festival may have gained fame from the horror flick “Midsommar,” the traditional Swedish celebration is nothing like the gruesome film. It’s a family-friendly event that celebrates the midnight sun — a summer phenomenon that allows Swedes to party in the sunshine all night long.

And on Friday, June 19, Sweden's tourism site, Visit Sweden, will be hosting a party on Facebook Live to celebrate from anywhere in the world.

"Learn to make a flower wreath, dance around the Midsummer pole, prepare a traditional Midsummer lunch and check out some skiing (yes skiing!) under the Midnight Sun!" their Facebook announcement wrote.

Typically, friends and family gather outside for a party, eat traditional food, make floral wreaths, dance around a maypole.

If you’re looking to eat along while you watch, a traditional Midsummer meal is pickled herring served with boiled potatoes, chives, and sour cream. Dessert is usually strawberries with fresh cream, according to Sweden’s official website. Down some unsweetened, flavored, or spiced schnapps while you’re wearing a floral crown and the festival is complete.

The online festivities will start at 5 a.m. ET and will continue until 6 p.m. ET, with skiing under Sweden’s midnight sun.

As the world approaches summer solstice, a slew of global festivals are impacted by the coronavirus pandemic. At Stonehenge in England, pagans (and enthusiasts) will not gather to watch the sunrise through the keystone, but like Midsummer, they will be able to tune in online.  And in Romania, locals will not gather in the town of Buzau for the Dragaica Fair, a long-running pagan festival that celebrates the start of the harvesting season.