Cailey Rizzo
July 09, 2018

Flight attendants on a JetBlue flight last week reportedly saved a French bulldog with an oxygen tank and breathing mask.

Darcy, a three-year-old French bulldog, started panting heavily on her flight from Orlando to Massachusetts last week. Her owner, Michele Burt, saw that the dog’s tongue and gums were blue, a sign of insufficient oxygen.

Darcy sat on Burt’s lap to calm down but she was still breathing fast. Flight attendants brought over ice packs to help. When Darcy continued her abnormal breathing, one flight attendant brought over an oxygen tank and a breathing mask. After Darcy breathed through the mask for a few minutes, she became alert and returned to normal.

“We all are affected by cabin pressure and oxygen fluctuations, human, canine and feline, etc., but the fact that the Attendants were responsive and attentive to the situation may have saved Darcy’s life,” Burt wrote on Facebook.

From a friend of a friend: ❤️❤️❤️ Hey everyone! A friend of mine wrote this letter to JetBlue about her recent...

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Burt confirmed that Darcy made a complete recovery and is fine post-flight.

“As a French bulldog owner myself, I knew the dog was overheating and needed some ice,” Renaud Fenster, one of the flight attendants, told Good Morning America. “I brought the dog some ice, and that didn't do anything. So I called the captain, and I told him, ‘I think I need to use some oxygen,’ and he said, ‘Go ahead.’ And right then and there, placed the oxygen on the dog and the dog revived like nothing else.”

“We all want to make sure everyone has a safe and comfortable fight, including those with four legs,” JetBlue said in a statement to ABC News. “We’re thankful for our crew’s quick thinking and glad everyone involved was breathing easier when the plane landed in Worcester.”

French bulldogs, like many other short-nosed dog breeds, are prone to respiratory problems. Several airlines ban these types of breeds from flying in cargo as the change in air pressure can cause severe breathing problems.

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