“We know some people around the globe are displaced and still need to get home."

By Alison Fox
March 23, 2020
Advertisement

United Airlines has brought about 3,500 stranded Americans home after reinstating some of its canceled flights even as it cuts 90 percent of its scheduled flights due to the drop in demand amid the coronavirus pandemic.

So far, the airline has operated 30 flights from Panama City, Quito, Lima, San Pedro Sula, Tegucigalpa and Roatan, with more than 20 more repatriation flights planned for this week, a United spokesman told Travel + Leisure.

The flights come as United announced it would reinstate seven previously canceled flights between the U.S. and Europe, Brazil, and South Korea over the next couple weeks as several countries have chosen to close their borders to help prevent the spread of COVID-19. Additionally, United will continue to offer flights between the U.S. and destinations including Tel Aviv, London, and Tokyo through May.

Looking out for their customers, the airline said that these flights are being operated “in an effort to get customers where they need to be.”

Specifically, this initiative comes on the heels of the European Union announcing that they're banning non-essential travel for 30 days and the U.S.-implemented ban on travel from Europe.

“We know some people around the globe are displaced and still need to get home,” the airline added in a post on Twitter.

United will operate six flights through May between: Newark and Frankfurt, Newark and London, Newark and Tel Aviv, Houston and Sao Paulo, San Francisco and Tokyo-Narita, and San Francisco and Sydney.

Previously canceled flights between Newark and Amsterdam, Munich, Brussels, and Sao Paulo, as well as between Washington-Dulles and London, and San Francisco and Frankfurt operated through March 27. A reinstated flight between San Francisco and Seoul operated through March 29.

Robert Alexander/Getty Images

United will also operate six flights through May between: Newark and Frankfurt, Newark and London, Newark and Tel Aviv, Houston and Sao Paulo, San Francisco and Tokyo-Narita, and San Francisco and Sydney.

When it comes to destinations that have banned flights, United said it was “actively looking for ways to bring customers who have been impacted by travel restrictions back to the United States. This includes working with the U.S. State Department and the local governments to gain permission to operate service.”

Many airlines have drastically cut service amid the spread of COVID-19, waiving change and cancellation fees in the process.