NPS Photo / William Leggett

Adventure on the border of Texas and New Mexico.

Travel + Leisure
August 28, 2012

Straddling the Texas-New Mexico border, the remote Guadalupe Mountains National Park is rife with desert fauna. With only 225,000 visitors each year, you’ll have the place mostly to yourself. Eighty miles of hiking trails crisscross 87,416 acres, and the wildlife spotting is stellar. In all, there are 60 species of mammals, 289 species of birds, and 55 species of reptiles. Expect to see coyotes, bobcats, mule deer, and black-tailed jackrabbits; before you go, remember to stash your camera in your pack.

Guadalupe Mountains National Park

Straddling the Texas/New Mexico border, the remote Guadalupe Mountains National Park is rife with desert fauna. Stop by the park visitor center for an overview of this rugged, 86,416-acre reserve with 80 miles of hiking trails. The best places to spot some of the 300 species of birdlife and such wildlife as gray foxes and mountain lions are McKittrick Canyon and Manzanita Spring, which are relatively easy to reach on foot.

Chuy's

For honest, spicy enchiladas and authentic Mexican fare.

Holiday Inn Express, Van Horn

A clean and modern chain hotel.

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