MANDEL NGAN / Staff
Erika Owen
April 10, 2017

If you need one more reason to stay up past your bedtime tonight, consider it done. If you find yourself outside at 2:08 a.m. ET on April 11, look up. Luckily, this happens to fall right around bar close for many spots around the United States.

The Pink Moon will be hitting its fullest point in this month's moon cycle, meaning it'll be at its farthest point from the sun. Don't let the name confuse you; the Pink Moon isn't any more colorful than other full moons. According to Space.com, it's given that name for the wild ground phlox that are blooming through the United States and Canada in the spring.

If you find yourself on the East Coast, the sun and moon will seem to set and rise, respectively, practically at the same time on Monday night (in reality, there's a three-minute gap in between the two). Those on the West Coast will not have the same situation, with the moon rising at 7:04 p.m. and the sun setting at 7:21 p.m. PT.

If you really want to know when you should be outside to catch the full moon highlights, check out TimeAndDate.com.

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