Ikonoform/Johannes Torpe
Cailey Rizzo
October 30, 2017

Iceland is famous for its unique landscapes.

Soon, visitors to the country could be able to book luxury accommodations without feeling like they’ve left the outdoors. The design firm Johannes Torpe has proposed an Icelandic spa and resort that disappears into its surroundings.

Ikonoform/Johannes Torpe

Upon entry, visitors wouldn’t see the Red Mountain Resort until the last possible second. It’s hidden by mountains and volcanoes until it “magically” emerges from the land, according to Johannes Torpe, the design studio behind the building.

Ikonoform/Johannes Torpe

“We wanted to create the illusion that one is entering another world when they arrive at the resort,” Torpe said. “It is a world that awakens and stimulates your senses in ways everyday life doesn’t have the capacity to do.”

Ikonoform/Johannes Torpe

The resort faces Snæfellsjokull, a glacier-covered stratovolcano where, according to Icelandic legend, a man named Barður Snæfellsás moved when he wanted to leave behind civilization and live in solitude.

Ikonoform/Johannes Torpe

The resort will include a 150-room hotel, artist residences, 20 bungalows and a restaurant. But the resort’s main draw will be an expansive spa, designed to bring guests through a “transformational journey” akin to that of Snæfellsás.

Related: The Best Places to See the Northern Lights

The spa experience starts in a steam room where, through the fog, guests may feel lost. They are then guided through states like contemplation, clarity and enlightenment. The “journey” features showers of rain, hot and cold baths and a floating salt bath.

The relationship with nature and Icelandic lore will continue throughout the resort. A natural lagoon flows into the reception area; rooms look out at the landscape through floor-to-ceiling glass windows; red-pigmented concrete will blend into the surrounding area, making the hotel appear to fade into the land.

The developer is currently making ground tests in the resort’s proposed location, according to Dwell.

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