Scott Brinegar/Disneyland Resort

Out with the old and in with the new.

Bailey Bennett
November 20, 2017

It’s no secret that big changes are coming to both Disney World and Disneyland in the coming years. Star Wars and Pixar franchises will soon have a much larger presence in the parks, and tons of exciting new attractions, hotels, and restaurants will be added to the growing Disney landscape. 

However, these upgrades don’t come without a cost, as older, classic Disney attractions must sometimes make way for the new. Fans have already been forced to say goodbye to Disneyland’s Tower of Terror and The Great Movie Ride at Disney World, to name a few. The latest (temporary) casualty in Disney’s growth is Disneyland’s California Screamin’ coaster, which will officially close on January 8.

The thrill ride, which opened in Anaheim in 2001, is part of the park’s Paradise Pier, an area that will soon be transformed into Pixar Pier, featuring four themed neighborhoods that center on Pixar film favorites. The coaster, however, won’t be gone for good. Instead, it will close for about six months in order to transform into the Incredicoaster, themed after The Incredibles. While the ride itself will remain largely the same, it will feature new scenes and special effects that are specific to the film, as well as updated ride vehicles.

The opening of the newly revamped coaster is rumored to be timed with the release of "The Incredibles 2" movie on June 14, 2018, although the rest of Pixar Pier is slated to open much sooner. The new areas will feature an "Incredibles"-themed land, an "Inside Out" attraction and area, a "Toy Story" neighborhood around the existing Toy Story Mania attraction, and updated Pixar art on the Mickey’s Fun Wheel gondolas. The pier will debut during Pixar Fest, which begins on April 13, 2018.

While we don’t have to say goodbye to California Screamin’ in its entirety, guests have less than two months to ride it in its original form. The ride’s extended closure, along with other restaurant and attraction closures on the pier, could, however, impact wait times and crowds throughout the rest of the park. 

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