Western Lakes + Mountains

Western Lakes + Mountains Travel Guide

Spot moose at this popular fishing location near Little Kennebago Lake.

Al Sherman and wife Phyllis started their farm in New Hampshire’s Saco River Valley in 1964, and their daughters continue the family tradition. It's grown to about 60 acres of vegetables with extra room to produce beef and pork.

Follow the Grafton Notch Loop Trail to the top of this 2,566-foot mountain (located 3.2 miles from Eddy Rd., Rte. 26). It’s especially lovely during the fall foliage is in full force (September–October).

Wess Connally opened his bookstore on the ground floor of a white Victorian building on Ridgeley’s Main Street in 1996, keeping in mind “great lines of literature and that it takes thinkers to make them.” He designed the selection at his grassroots bookstore to appeal to readers with general inte

One of Maine’s tallest peaks, measuring 4,120 feet, Saddleback draws skiers and snowboarders with 66 trails, some of which overlook the Rangeley Lakes.

This 35.6-mile scenic route meanders through some of western Maine’s most picturesque terrain. The Rangeley Lakes Scenic Byway begins on Route 4, just outside of Rangeley, Maine, passes by Rangeley Village and Rangeley Lake, then continues on Route 17.

Hike the trail for foliage views. The Appalachian Mountain club maintains the trail; contact them for maps and information.

Operating out of a white smokehouse located in the Central Maine foothills just outside of North Anson, the Luce Family have been selling smoked beef, pork, and even venison for about 100 years.

This green cabin in the small, western Maine town of Rangeley is just a short walk from Greenvale Cove on Rangeley Lake.

The whole family can enjoy the challenging runs at this ski mountain.

This sprawling western Maine museum from the trust of Wilhelm Reich, a noted psychiatrist, psychoanalyst, and scientist, spans 175 acres.

This mountain in western Maine features 550 acres of trails for skiing and snowboarding.

This nature store in Western Maine formed its ethos by combining three ideas: eco (ecology), pelagi (pelagic), and con (conservation), with pelagic referring to surface life in coastal waters.