West Village

Restaurants in West Village

The second restaurant from April Bloomfield focuses on (what else?) seafood.

If there is one thing this West Village restaurant doesn’t need, it’s more press. Since opening the city’s first gastro pub in 2004, chef April Bloomfield has won accolades galore with her seasonal British and Italian dishes.

Packed since the day it was launched in December 2007 by a trio of Bouley veterans, Bar Blanc exudes a grown-up glamour and self-assurance rarely seen in this era of slacker neighborhood joints.

Easy to miss, this unassuming West Village restaurant is located inside an unmarked, 100-year-old brownstone. After entering through the dimly lit basement, diners step upstairs to the intimate, candle-lit dining room that feels reminiscent of a dinner party.

Zak Pelaccio is a shaggy, pork-loving genius whose food takes elements of laid-back locavorism, the slow-smoke traditions of southern BBQ, and the sweet, spicy, fermented goodness of Southeast Asia and cobbles together a witty, funky, and yes, deliciously fatty style all his own.

At this West Village eatery, Mario Batali and Joe Bastianich successfully recreate a traditional Roman osteria (a casual eatery serving wine and simple fare).

Styled after a country estate, restaurateur Keith McNally’s Waverly Place trattoria frames its rustic furnishings—farmhouse-style tables and chairs and old wooden cabinets—within a space that features weathered brick columns and wooden ceiling beams warmly illuminated by candlestick-shade chandel

Joe Campanale seems too young to have been a sommelier at Babbo—he’s 24—but his Joe Campanale seems too young to have been a sommelier at Babbo—he’s 24—but his smart Italian wine list and herbal-infused cocktails at this always-packed new restaurant prove otherwise. Drinks $15.

Named after a style of country house found in the south of France, Mas is a French-inspired eatery in the heart of New York’s Greenwich Village. The ambiance is rustic chic, with unfinished wooden floorboards and paneling and low lighting.

More than 900 bottles of fine spirits, including the city’s largest scotch collection, line the backlit “bookshelves” at this Tribeca lounge.

Located on the corner of Carmine and Bedford Streets in the West Village, this airy restaurant has large windows to take in passers-by. Exposed brick walls, vaulted ceilings, and an open kitchen mark the interior.