Washington

Things to do in Washington

This outfitter teaches basic climbing skills that enable novices to reach Columbia Crest while attached to a guide by ropes.

Just a few miles off the Coulee Corridor, this 640-acre park makes a great spot for a picnic, a boat ride on the freshwater reservoir, and, of course, the bird watching for which the area is known.

Instead of beer-soaked concrete and standing-room only, this rock club for grownups offers plush cabaret-style seating in semicircular booths, and a full menu of snacks, entrées, and creative cocktails. With this kind of setup, sight lines are guaranteed, and the acoustics are great.

The Clyde Theatre, a 1937 movie house, screens the classics.

For an aquatic perspective of Gig Harbor, rent a kayak, canoe, paddleboat, or powerboat. For more surefooted types, there's also the relatively newer sport of paddleboarding. Guided and non-guided excursions are available, in addition to lessons and a kayak camp for kids.

Martinis are big at Tini Bigs—served in 10-oz. glasses, to be precise. Belltown is home to this unpretentious lounge specializing in cocktails classic and original.

Check out the migration maps and cetacean skeletons.

This park has seen impressive regrowth since the 1980 eruption, but it’s still full of eerie landscapes and volcanic remnants. Stop at the Castle Rock Visitor Center for hiking information.

Dig for littleneck clams along the shore of this retired army base.

Puget Sound's oldest lighthouse watches over the evergreen-lined coast. Scan the sand for dogwinkles, limpets, and geoducks - the world's biggest burrowing clams - and be sure to look up for a glimpse of Mount Rainier.

This nine-acre waterfront spread is arguably the most gorgeous addition to the Seattle Art Museum (it even outshines the recently renovated main museum, about a mile away).

This curiosity shop is the brainchild of artist Curtis Steiner, whose 1,000 Blocks project (a thousand painted wooden blocks that can be arranged to form different patterns) is in the Seattle Art Museum's permanent collection.

Before textese there was shorthand, and Shorthand Press lovingly celebrates the elegant, cursive characters of this obscure written English, on greeting cards, postcards, notebooks, and tees. Commonly used by midcentury secretaries and paralegals, the form languished in recent decades.