Washington Travel Guide

This outfitter teaches basic climbing skills that enable novices to reach Columbia Crest while attached to a guide by ropes.

Just a few miles off the Coulee Corridor, this 640-acre park makes a great spot for a picnic, a boat ride on the freshwater reservoir, and, of course, the bird watching for which the area is known.

While you're in one of the best whale-watching spots in the world, don't miss boating out to Haro Strait to marvel at breaching orcas and humpbacks frolicking with their calves.

Since 1951, this brick-faced Port Townsend museum in this historic district has welcomed visitors to what was once a City Hall court room.

Since the Mariners’ inaugural game in 1999, their “new” stadium has been a top destination for Major League Baseball fans. The 47,000-capacity, SoDo (south of downtown) stadium offers good-to-great sightlines to the field from all angles.

This northwestern Seattle neighborhood is known for its Scandinavian, fishing-village past, but the Salmon Bay community is reinventing itself as an up-and-coming shopping, bar, and restaurant district.

Named after the 1920's phonograph, Victrola Coffee Roasters celebrates the exuberant zeitgeist of this bygone era at its three Seattle locations.

Day-trippers head 25 miles north of Seattle to Whidbey Island, where beaches, nature, and wildlife abound. For panoramic views of the Olympic Mountains and Strait of Juan de Fuca, visit Fort Ebey State Park.

Dark-wood booths, wine-red walls, and candlelight combine to create a dark and intimate vibe in this Green Lake bistro and lounge.

Check out the gleaming shops, which include 7, For All Mankind and Michael Kors Lifestyle.

Visit the Nutcracker Museum, which displays more than 5,000 of the iconic toy.

Take a photo op where the falls plunge into a perfectly round canyon.

This Georgetown decor shop sells cool collector furniture and one-of-a-kind and found objects.