Washington

Hotels in Washington

It’s easy to get distracted by all the high-tech amenities at the 1000—along with iPod docking stations, Wi-Fi, and personally programmed sensors that control everything from climate to mood lighting in each of the 120 rooms, the hotel also boasts an ingenious (or useless, depending on your POV)

On 83 woodsy acres in one of the prettiest parts of the Pacific Northwest, accommodations range from a lodge and an Airstream to 15 comfortable tent cabins.

Set on Carillon Point overlooking Lake Washington, this 100-room property is a popular wedding and weekend getaway destination. It’s also a frequent home base for business travelers working at nearby Microsoft Redmond Campus.

Contemporary chalet overlooking Snoqualmie Falls in the Cascade Range foothills, with a stellar selection of wilderness offerings, from guided bike rides to kayaking.


On the waterfront, the hotel has 15 tastefully decorated rooms named for historic ships that plied the local seas. Some have gas fireplaces and private balconies.

You don’t have to love art galleries, vintage-boutique shopping, or indie-rock concerts to enjoy staying at the Max—but it sure helps.

The boldly decorated suites range from the crisp white linens and dark woods to opulence and all-red walls.

Incredible Elliott Bay and Puget Sound vistas are the draw at this 70-room hotel (which, yes, sits right next to the famous Pike Place Market). The best way to enjoy them: sipping coffee or a cocktail from a teak lounge chair on the fifth-floor deck.

The property is the only beachfront hotel in the park, opt for one of the ocean-view log cabins.

This hillside Victorian bed and breakfast, built in 1889, has spectacular views of Puget Sound and Commencement Bay. Surrounded by 100-plus-year-old native cherry trees, it’s within easy distance of downtown and just 30 minutes south of Seattle.

Chef Blaine Wetzel earned his forager’s badge under Rene Redzepi at Noma in Copenhagen; now he brings the same edible ethic to the 15-room Willows Inn on Lummi Island, two hours north of Seattle.

With its self-consciously hearty, rustic interiors—all log and pine furniture, checks and tartans, river stones and slate—the Edgewater takes the Pacific Northwest-lodge motif to the nth degree.

There are no TV’s or phones to distract from the idyllic views. Rooms in the converted 1916 tavern and Roosevelt cottages feel the most authentic, thanks to rustic birch furniture and pine-lined walls.