Washington

Hotels in Washington

No car required here.

A dramatic winery resort with low-slung mini-villas built along a cliff side.

Intimate retreat on a Puget Sound island, with a weekends-only (plus Thursdays in summer) restaurant that's justly famous.

On the waterfront, the hotel has 15 tastefully decorated rooms named for historic ships that plied the local seas. Some have gas fireplaces and private balconies.

Chic and cheap, this 28-room hotel draws visiting designers and musicians, along with bargain-hunting hipsters. Rooms are spare, but have appealing, artist’s-loft details—hardwood floors, exposed white-painted brick walls, antique steam radiators, and tongue-in-cheek street art selections.

This comfortable and modern motel with a small swimming pool fronts a pleasant riverside walking and biking path.

The call of the wild meets upscale comfort at Alderbrook Resort & Spa, two hours west of Seattle.

Situated on Lake Union’s southern shore, this 184-room hotel has panoramic views of the waterfront and city skyline. The guest rooms are basic in style, but most overlook the lake and come equipped with free Wi-Fi and 42-inch plasma TV’s. Some also have gas fireplaces and oversize Jacuzzi tubs.

Seattle’s first self-proclaimed “art hotel” fills its 121 rooms with works selected by a Seattle Art Museum curator; themed suites are dedicated to local artists and arts institutions (the J. P.

The comfortable B&B makes up for its simplicity with views of Silver Lake and Mount St. Helens.

For total Victorian immersion book a four-poster bed at the turreted hotel.

Adjacent to the Washington State Convention Center, the 425-room, Grand Hyatt is a big hotel that flaunts a number of boutique-hotel flourishes (like Marble-clad, four-piece baths feature shower enclosures and deep, soaker tubs).

Set farther north than the city’s other downtown hotels, this glittering high-rise is separate from the madding crowd (although that’s temporary—a burgeoning gateway district is fast sprouting around it).