Washington, D.C.

Restaurants in Washington, D.C.

Washington D.C.’s culinary scene is exploding. As a result, top-notch restaurants in Washington, D.C. are popping up everywhere, with kitchens dishing up fare inspired by cultures around the world. Here, a few of the best restaurants in Washington, D.C. to whet your appetite.
In the Atlas District, Granville Moore’s serves hearty bison burgers and Belgian beer. The eatery’s Belgian fries have won them a loyal following among locals, and so has their happy hour, which goes from 10 p.m. until the wee hours.
At the Spy City Café, located next to the International Spy Museum, you can check out old covert mission maps while eating a cheeseburger. Order the Pigs Undercover while sipping Moxie, the world’s oldest cola brand. Also next to the museum, Zola restaurant’s “secret” door leads diners to the restrooms.
For a late meal after the theater—Warner’s Theater is steps away—Equinox has a constantly changing menu featuring mid-Atlantic specialties such as oysters wrapped in Virginia ham. It’s one of best Washington, D.C. restaurants.
Many restaurants in Washington, D.C. serve Latin American food, but Ceiba is the one to visit. Walls are hung with folk art and the Cuban black bean soup is delicious.

Developed by chef José Andrés, the Minibar at America Eats is a unique dining experience. The restaurant-within-a-restaurant is located on the second floor of America Eats, formerly Café Atlántico, and has limited seating (it only accommodates six people).

For a guy with a jet-black mohawk and skateboarding sneakers, Proof’s wine director, Sebastian Zutant, is on surprisingly familiar terms with some very fancy wines.

Opened at Southwest Waterfront’s Gangplank Marina in 2003, this casual eatery is the only marina restaurant located on top of the water. Situated between dinner cruise ships and the U.S.S.

Owner Nick Fontana, a native Texan, opened Capital Q with the goal of creating an authentic Texas barbecue joint, complete with cafeteria-style ordering, wooden stools, and paper towel rolls on the tables.

Brothers Yared and Henock Tesfaye, Ethiopian transplants, opened Etete in 2004. The restaurant, a gift for their mother, serves traditional Ethiopian food and has managed to distinguish itself from the plethora of other Ethiopian restaurants in the area, now known as Little Ethiopia.

This Federal-style townhouse on a quiet street in Georgetown was converted into a restaurant in 1960. Taking its name from the year the Constitution was adopted, 1789 occupies six cozy dining rooms within an elegant and renovated two-story townhouse furnished with period American antiques.

Oya

Sushi and French fusion reign at this conspicuously cool Penn Quarter restaurant with a Miami-chic feel. White décor and an indoor waterfall enliven the dimly lit and intimate space populated by a see-and-be-seen locals crowd.

Housed inside the 1841 General Post Office building, Poste Moderne Brasserie serves updated American cuisine in an environmentally-friendly atmosphere. The restaurant uses vegetables and herbs from an organic garden, serves organic coffee, and practices composting.

Since chef Ann Cashion first opened this upscale Southern comfort-food joint in 1995, it's become a neighborhood institution. Her menu, with its New American emphasis on the local, sustainable, and organic, translates to equal parts uptown and down-home on the table.

Inspired by owner Mike Benson’s affinity for flying and the works of French author-pilot Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, Café Saint-Ex is a neighborhood bistro with an understated aviation theme.

Although its name and appearance call to mind the standard Chinese takeout joint in Anytown, USA, Chinatown Express, located on the same block as the Verizon Center, is anything but.

Equinox is located just off of Lafayette Park, and is a scant block from the White House and Warner's Theater.

An offshoot of the popular District franchise, Cakelove, Love Café is a casual gathering spot serving coffee, sweets, and light meals. The café, like its sister shop, was founded by Warren Brown, a lawyer-turned-baker.