Washington, D.C.

Restaurants in Washington, D.C.

Washington D.C.’s culinary scene is exploding. As a result, top-notch restaurants in Washington, D.C. are popping up everywhere, with kitchens dishing up fare inspired by cultures around the world. Here, a few of the best restaurants in Washington, D.C. to whet your appetite.
In the Atlas District, Granville Moore’s serves hearty bison burgers and Belgian beer. The eatery’s Belgian fries have won them a loyal following among locals, and so has their happy hour, which goes from 10 p.m. until the wee hours.
At the Spy City Café, located next to the International Spy Museum, you can check out old covert mission maps while eating a cheeseburger. Order the Pigs Undercover while sipping Moxie, the world’s oldest cola brand. Also next to the museum, Zola restaurant’s “secret” door leads diners to the restrooms.
For a late meal after the theater—Warner’s Theater is steps away—Equinox has a constantly changing menu featuring mid-Atlantic specialties such as oysters wrapped in Virginia ham. It’s one of best Washington, D.C. restaurants.
Many restaurants in Washington, D.C. serve Latin American food, but Ceiba is the one to visit. Walls are hung with folk art and the Cuban black bean soup is delicious.

As much a cultural experience as a place for a meal, this restaurant and sushi bar on MacArthur Blvd takes traditional Japanese dining seriously. Dinner at Makoto is a formal affair in an environment where rules of decorum are observed and hushed tones seem appropriate.

Owned by celebrity chef Wolfgang Puck, the Source is an acclaimed pan-Asian restaurant located inside the Newseum. The restaurant is divided into two sections: a formal upstairs dining room and a casual downstairs lounge inspired by traditional Japanese izakayas (after-work drinkin

Opened in Logan Circle in 2001, this small restaurant quickly earned a loyal following with its authentic and affordable Thai cuisine.

Poste Moderne Brasserie is technically a part of the Hotel Monaco, but it's housed inside the 1841 General Post Office building. The restaurant has its own entrance accessed through a carriageway and a courtyard.

Housed inside D.C.’s Colorado Building, an historic Beaux Arts office building just a block from the White House, Ceiba’s menu celebrates chef Jeff Tunks’ travels through the Yucatan, Brazil, Peru, and Cuba.

This Woodley Park Lebanese restaurant was opened by Lebanese immigrants Tanios and Marie Abi-Najm in 1990, after the success of their first restaurant in Arlington, Virginia.

Mexican tile and native folk craft lend an authentic feel to this first-outside-of-NYC Rosa Mexicano location splendidly housed in the restored 1924 Hecht's building.

One of the D.C. area’s go-to destinations for Italian cuisine, Obelisk offers diners authentic Italian fare in a five course, prix fixe format.

Green to the extreme, this 21st-century approximation of a farmhouse just blocks from the White House features menus printed on recycled paper and award-winning CORE architecture.

Located in the Adams Morgan neighborhood, this authentic Ethiopian eatery is named after the calendar month that marks the end of a long rainy season in Ethiopia. Accordingly, the ceiling of the three-level dining room is painted with a bright yellow sunburst.

Dino, located in Cleveland Park, is an Italian-inspired eatery decked in shades of gold and orange.

Voted the best Mediterranean eatery inside the Beltway for three years running, this Penn Quarter restaurant and bar is a downtown destination for locals on Friday nights.

As genuine an Italian pizzeria as you'll find this side of the Atlantic, Two Amys has a wood-burning oven, a pizza license from Naples, and suitably enthusiastic crowds that often raise the noise level to fortissimo.